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Book Publicist Scott Lorenz offers Authors Book Marketing Tips and Techniques on his Blog “The Book Publicist”

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SCOTT LORENZ

Authors: Here’s How to do a GREAT Media Interview

TV and Radio Interview Tips for Authors

Remember, an Interview is a Conversation, not a Monologue or a SPEECH!

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

Before scheduling authors for media interviews one of the most important things I convey is that an interview is a conversation… NOT a Speech.

I was interviewed recently by Vanessa Denha Garmo on WJR in Detroit about my own book called Book Title Generator. We discussed the importance of a good title that is memorable. Because when you’re driving down the freeway and you catch an interview with an author you want to remember the title so you can buy it!

Off air, Vanessa confessed that she had a 14-minute interview with a guest on her show which airs on Ave Maria Radio. “He engaged in one my biggest pet peeves. He shared all his information in the first questions asked. He was informative but longwinded,” said Garmo.

She said that she managed to get in just two questions during the entire interview and ended having to cut him off. “I despise interrupting a guest in mid-sentence, but we ran out of time. This is not the first time this has happened. When I sense someone is answering more than the question, I let them know how much time there is left in the interview,” said Garmo.

One rule to follow is that if the answer to a question takes you two minutes to answer, you have spoken too long. Garmo conducts media training sessions with clients, and coaches them to answer the question and move on. Remember, give the interviewer an opportunity to ask more questions. It’s the host’s show, not yours.

As a book publicist, we supply the media with suggested questions to guide the interview and to assist them in case they’ve not had time to read the book. When being interviewed on the radio, TV or for a podcast, we make those questions concise, informative and to the point. With print reporters, you have more leeway but when you are on broadcast interview, you have a specific amount of time to talk, and the host will cut you off if you are verbose.

Also, keep in mind that an interview is an audition for a repeat visit, or another show produced by the host or producer. One of my favorite talk show hosts first brings my clients on for a podcast and if she likes them she’ll bring them back for a TV interview. They won’t want to bring you back on if you ramble or take up the entire interview segment answering one question. The interview is a conversation, not a monologue.

Garmo says the best way to avoid this issue is to prepare ahead of time. Anticipate the questions that could be asked… in case they don’t use your own questions.

Then practice answering the questions. You could even record yourself answering the questions and watch your time. Find out ahead how long the interview will be and prepare for the exact points you want to get across. Part of managing a message is managing the time you take answering a question.

Here are Vanessa Denha Garmo’s basic strategies when being interviewed on LIVE TV, Radio or a Podcast.

  1. Manage the time by knowing how much time you have for a LIVE interview.
  2. Prepare your points ahead of time.
  3. If you are truly an expert, you will know the subject well. Share what you know.
  4. Be specific and to the point.
  5. Share stories that are brief and relevant.
  6. Be genuine and authentic by being yourself.
  7. Always Speak the TRUTH!

I like to remind my clients that an interview is a conversation many people are listening to and requires ‘give and take’ during the process.

The Bottom Line: Remember, an interview is a conversation, not a monologue or a SPEECH! Get media training. Don’t wing it!

If you would like to get professional media training with Communications Strategist, Vanessa Denha Garmo please visit her website: https://epiphanyccc.com/

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


National Publicity Summit – Should You Go?

National Publicity Summit New York

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

As a book publicist I get asked by clients and authors about going to the National Publicity Summit in New York. I’ve attended almost every Summit since Steve Harrison started it and go once or twice a year to create new media relationships, maintain old ones and of course, to pitch my clients to the media. Through the Summit, I’ve gotten clients booked on Fox News, PBS, CNBC, MSNBC and a number of national magazines.

I represent a lot of authors. Here’s the problem: authors have to do most of the promotion of their books if they want them to sell. Even if you’ve been picked up by one of the big publishing houses, they only do so much to get you media attention. This is the reality.

So, let’s say you decide to get media attention yourself. You plan your trip to New York City, where most of the big media are headquartered. You roll into Manhattan with your strategy all laid out: “First, I’m going to try to meet with the producer of Good Morning America, and then I’m going to Fox News, and then I’m going to see the guy at Reuters. After lunch, I’m going to try to talk to the Today Show and then I’m going to stop by and see if I can talk to the producer of 60 Minutes.”

Forget about it. It’s not going to happen.

Reason #1 why I recommend the Summit for many people is access, one-on-one, to these media gatekeepers in a very efficient and organized event. But is it for every author? Depending on your situation, it may or may not make sense to go. I’d recommend it if you have a consumer-oriented, non-fiction topic. Does it have broad audience appeal? Can your book help the average person in their day-to-day lives? If so, then it makes sense for you to consider attending.

If you have a highly technical topic such as how computers work, or one about a historical event such as WWII, it probably doesn’t make sense to go to the Publicity Summit, unless you can connect your book to current trends. (In fact, the Summit staff will probably turn down your application if they feel that the media would not be interested in the topic.) Generally, fiction, poetry and books about localized topics will not do well at the Summit. For example, a book about the best bars in Chicago would probably not be of interest to the national media who attend the Summit.

Should you go if you feel you’re not ready to meet the media? Here’s the dirty little secret: no-one feels ready. Don’t worry about that. If you’re an expert with a decent topic with a unique angle, the Summit can work for you. Go there to build relationships, yes, but also go to get feedback from the news industry professionals. I’ve seen people before the Summit starts coming in thinking they’re heading in one direction, then after having interacted with 100 journalists and producers, leaving with all new information or direction…a better book title, the perfect pitch, new business ventures and relationships.

I’m such a fan of Steve Harrison and his National Publicity Summit that I am now an affiliate for the Summit. If you are interested in attending please check out this link: http://bit.ly/Big-Time-PR

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


18 Literary Agents Reveal “How to Land a Book Deal”

Literary Agents Spill The Beans

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Whether you’re a new author or have been on the New York Times Bestseller List for years, literary agents are likely top of mind. After all, these professionals may be just what you need to get published or take your career to the next level. A quality agent can review your manuscript and help you land a lucrative book deal.

Since literary agents are so integral to success, I came up with this revealing compilation of interviews with literary agents. Tune in and prepare to be inspired! Sometimes all that it takes is a little insight into the process that can help you gain a competitive edge and succeed in your writing career.

1. Jeff Herman

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0F4vvTWG74)

Jeff Herman is a well-respected agent and the author of “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents.” He entered book publishing in his mid 20s when he didn’t have much experience. Since he had to figure out a lot on his own, he wrote this book to steer new authors in the right direction. In my opinion, investing in this book is a must, no matter where you are in your career. Once you read it, you’ll find it well worth the money.

Jeff Herman

2. Brooks Sherman

(https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2116395441773699)

Brooks Sherman shares what he looks for in a query letter. He explains that the most effective letters focus on plot and character rather than themes or messages. In addition, he likes to learn about a writer’s educational background as well as details about any past publications and writer’s workshops they’ve participated in.

Brooks Sherman

3. Mollie Glick

(https://sobookingcool.com/2018/09/12/interview-with-literary-agent-mollie-glick/)

Mollie Glick states that she loves her job as a literacy agent because it challenges her to figure out how to push messages that are worth sharing into the world. She often reaches out to authors who have accomplished something that is incredibly inspirational or post something that sparks an interesting conversation.

Mollie Glick

4. Sallyanne Sweeney

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEoU5xA6HeY)

Sallyanne Sweeney explains that she enjoys working with writers on manuscripts that they might have been working on for years. She loves to see the transformation from an initial idea to a finished book and being involved in every aspect of the publishing process.

Sallyanne Sweeney

5. Howard Yoon

(https://www.rossyoon.com/howard-yoon)

Howard Yoon explains that the process of working with an author is a lot like dating. During the first couple of meetings, you’re not sure if things are going to work out. When it actually does work, everything clicks. Yoon chooses books he believes have a valuable contribution to the world.

Howard Yoon

6. Mark Gottlieb

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sQGSPrdaA8)

Mark Gottlieb talks about how authors can go about finding agents. He says that authors should always aim high and think highly of themselves. Gottlieb recommends Publishers Marketplace, which ranks publishers by number of book deals and lets you filter your search by genre.

Mark Gottlieb

7. Alyssa Jennette

(https://www.facebook.com/cardinalrulepress/videos/1158824181170762)

Alyssa Jennette talks about what authors should do before seeking an agent. She suggests they send their work to a critique group, an editor, or another professional so they can look it over and provide feedback before it gets in front of an agent. This way it’ll be as ready for publishing as possible.

Alyssa Jennette

8. Jessica Reino

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM-Y8xucJsE)

Jessica Reino reinforces the fact that every author is unique so it’s important to write what you want to write and edit your work the way you see fit. She also discusses Twitter and other social media platforms, which she highly recommends to nonfiction authors. Reino notes that if you’re going to create social media outlets, only do so if you’re going to actively use them.

Jessica Reino

9. Eva Scalzo

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL0vYbcgohY)

Eva Scalzo encourages her authors to tell her which editors and publishers they’d like to work with as many have specific preferences. She advises them on what they need to know about these professionals and organizations and helps them come up with a back up plan.

Eva Scalzo

10. Katie Greenstreet

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rr6d0X2P7k)

Katie Greenstreet explains that she looks for a very unique voice in the first chapter. She loves quirky narrators and will always be drawn to something that she hasn’t seen before. Greenstreet also wants to know that an author truly understands the big picture of their work and conveys it clearly in their synopsis.

Katie Greenstreet

11. Jim McCarthy

(http://www.middlegradeninja.com/2020/08/middle-grade-ninja-episode-88-literary.html)

Jim McCarthy explains that there are plenty of great books but he can’t represent them for the sole reason that he doesn’t have the editorial vision for them. He reinforces the fact that authors should find agents that are worthy of them.

Jim McCarthy

12. Stephen Barbara

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2ymzI9EcLk)

Stephen Barbara reveals that his role as an agent is a combination of support, advocacy, and a little bit of therapy. He also explains that he likes query letters that prove writers have done their research and know who he is and what he’s done in the past.

Stephen Barbara

13. Broo Doherty

(https://vimeo.com/511534956)

Broo Doherty discusses general questions about literary agents and gives insight about what it’s like to be an agent. She also dives deep into what she’s looking for in new clients and how she manages her existing client base.

Broo Doherty

14. Ted Weinstein

(https://vimeo.com/18828443)

Ted Weinstein states that the keys to success for any author come down to two things: marketability and personal passion. He also encourages authors to do their research when looking for agents and recommends a few great books for them to read.

Ted Weinstein

15. Davinia Andrew-Lynch

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kRN33R_Y68)

Davinia Andrew-Lynch goes over the typical day of a literary agent. She explains that every day is different. Some days are packed with meetings while others are filled with editing manuscripts. There are also days reserved for admin work like sorting through contracts and consulting with designers about covers.

Davinia Andrew-Lynch

16. Donald Maass

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BhFf27agew)

Renowned agent Donald Maass founded the Donald Maass Literary Agency in 1980. His agency sells more than 150 novels to major publishers on a national and global level. He states that he tries to articulate why a certain plot or character isn’t working to truly help authors.

Donald Maass

17. Andrea Somberg

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axgOKH-2p8o)

Andrea Somberg has been a literary agent for over 15 years and represents several New York Times best selling authors. In this hour-long interview, she discusses a number of topics, including what draws her to queries, what types of authors succeed, and how new authors can grow their careers.

Andrea Somberg

18. Chip MacGregor

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PeuQOd5bIg)

Chip MacGregor has represented many big time authors including Brennan Manning, Vincent Zandri, Rachel Hauck, Mindy Clark, Irene Hannon, Bonnie Gray, and Michelle McKinney. In this interview, he talks about the changing world of publishing, primarily in the Christian market.

Chip MacGregor

The Bottom Line: Watch these literary agent interviews. Take notes. Even if they don’t represent your genre they can offer you insight into the process of “Getting A BOOK DEAL.”

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

There’s nothing sweeter than a romance novel in movie form. If you’ve written a romantic comedy, you may be wondering what it takes to get it turned into a Hallmark movie. Fortunately, the Hallmark Channel clearly outlines the steps you must take to bring your heartwarming work to its audience. Here’s an overview of what it entails.

Understand the Hallmark Channel’s Ideal Novels

Hallmark looks for uplifting and inspirational novels related to romantic love, family love, and love between friends. The ideal story ranges from 75,000 to 90,000 words with relatable characters that overcome conflict and an ending filled with hope and happiness. While Hallmark’s stories typically take place in the U.S. the channel is open to American stories overseas.

When it comes to contemporary romance, Hallmark is most interested in beach settings, Valentine’s Day and Christmas stories, laugh-out-loud romance comedies, novels with a unique time element as well as those that involve brothers or male best friends. The Hallmark channel is open to all types of submissions so don’t be afraid to intrigue them with something that’s not on their list.

It’s important to note that Hallmark does steer away from paranormal romance, romantic suspense, young adult, new adult romance, and religious romance. As of 2022, they’re not interested in cozy mysteries. Also, novels with sex, nudity, profanity, or violence are not permitted. The extent of the physical interaction in your story should be hugging and kissing.

Submit Your Rom-Com in the Proper Format

The Hallmark Channel asks that you submit one MSWord document with a four-to-five page synopsis and a second document with the first three chapters of your novel. Make sure your submission is in Times New Roman font, size 12, and double spaced. Also, add the title, genre, and actual or estimated final word count to the subject line. Check the Hallmark website to learn more about the deadline for your submission and where to send it.

Learn From Other Authors

There have been many authors who have been able to turn their rom-coms into Hallmark movies, so it only makes sense to turn to them for some advice. Denise Hunter’s novel The Convenient Groom made it to Hallmark. It’s about a young celebrity marriage counselor that gets left at the altar of her own highly publicized wedding.

“Publish your novels through a publisher that actively seeks movie deals. I’m sure there are many ways producers “find” novels. But in my case, it was through HarperCollins Christian Publishing, whose rights department routinely pitches their novels for film rights,” Hunter says.

“Utilize a romance trope; they’re popular for a reason. If you can take a trope and spin it in a fresh way, all the better. The Convenient Groom is, of course, a modern-day marriage of convenience story,” she adds.

Tracy Andreen is another noteworthy author who wrote six films produced for Hallmark, including Snow Bride, Picture a Perfect Christmas, and It’s Christmas Eve. When asked what her secret sauce to success is, she replied with, “Being professional. When given a deadline, I do everything in my power to deliver on that deadline, especially as the time to start production nears.”

In addition to meeting deadlines, she says that it’s important to love what you do. “I love what I do and am beyond grateful for the opportunity to be able to do it, but at the end of the day it’s still work . . . awesome work I love, so I’m thrilled to do so and, hopefully, that shines through,” Andreen explains.

There’s also Jenny Hale whose novel Christmas Wishes & Mistletoe Kisses got picked by Hallmark. “It seems like romance is easy to write, but it’s a very careful dance between making it magical while also creating scenes and characters that feel real and relatable,” she says.

“People have told me for years that my books would be perfect for a Hallmark movie,” says bestselling romance author Pamela Gossiaux. “So this year I submitted my book The Scent of Love, a sweet, small town romance about the owner of a candle and gift shop, and the handsome man who rents the cottage on the shore. I love the type of books and movies that Hallmark produces. They’re the perfect escape!”

The Bottom Line: The Hallmark Channel produces 90+ holiday and romance films per year. With creativity, persistence, and passion, your novel may be one of them!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


How to Title Your Book

How to Title Your Book By Scott Lorenz

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Some authors agonize over the titling of their book and some pull it straight out of thin air. I suggest a more methodical approach.

Book Title GeneratorI was recently interviewed by author and television talk show host Tara Kachaturoff on Michigan Entrepreneur TV. We discussed book marketing, book publicity and the care authors should take in the creation of their own book title.

As the author of Book Title Generator: A Proven System in Naming Your Book and as a book publicist I can attest to the importance of naming your book properly.

A bad title gets panned by the public and a forgettable title is, well, forgotten!

The most important aspect in the book publishing process, besides writing a good book, is to have a memorable title. So, I created a step-by-step method in selecting a title and put that in my book.

“This is an amazing book,” said Kachaturoff. “It is excellent. Since I work in this area with my clients, and have written a couple of books, I know how important a good title is. The book is phenomenal and covers so much,” she concluded.

I use a multi-prong book titling strategy with high-tech tools, researching bestsellers by genre and choosing ‘title keywords’ which get a book ranked on search engines and Amazon. I also recommend that authors consider the use of numbers, alliteration, and idioms in the quest for the perfect book title.

Watch the entire interview at https://bit.ly/ScottLorenz_Book_Publicist_EntrepreneurTV

 

Book Title Generator has received dozens of awards in numerous categories ranging from writing and publishing to business and marketing. The awards include: The Independent Author Network Award, Pinnacle Book Achievement Award, eLit Award, Literary Titan Book Award, Royal Dragonfly Award, American Book Fest, Book Readers Appreciation, Wishing Shelf, The New England Book Festival, Firebird Book Awards, New York Book Festival, San Francisco Book Festival, The Presidents Book Award, IPPY Book Award, Next Generation Award, AXIOM Business Book Award, Book Excellence Award, AMG International, PenCraft Book Achievement, Book of the Year Award, Best Book Award, B.R.A.G. Medallion, FAPA’s President’s Silver Award and the International Book Award.

If you take the time and utilize the tools laid out in the book and choose the right search engine-optimized title, your book will have a competitive advantage and have a shot at being at the top of the Amazon rankings. Choose the wrong title and your book languishes in obscurity.

Here’s what authors and top Amazon reviewers say about Book Title Generator:

“Bottom line: this is a compilation of clever ideas from a highly-experienced book publicist. Even the most experienced author will benefit from them.” —Richard B. Schwartz, Amazon Top 500 Reviewer, Top Contributor, 5-Stars

“I particularly enjoyed his analysis on the effectiveness of idioms, alliteration, and metaphors in developing effective book titles. I recommend the book to both new and experienced authors.” —Barbara Mojica, Amazon Top 1000 Reviewer, Top Contributor, 5-Stars

“This is an indispensable, first rate adjunct to the art of writing – and selling- your book. The goal: discoverability! Very highly recommended.” —Grady Harp, Amazon Top 50 Hall of Fame Reviewer, 5-Stars

“Book Publicist Scott Lorenz gives you the ABCs and XYZs of picking the perfect title for that book you have put your heart into. It’s required reading for aspiring or experienced writers.” —John Kelly, Detroit Free Press, 5 Stars

“I am an author, and I have been writing for over 10 years. This book is exactly what I have been looking for all this time. Scott Lorenz understands the creative side while delving into the marketing side of naming a book. It explains how to set yourself up for success.” —Iris, Amazon reviewer, 5 Stars

The book is available on Amazon in ebook for Kindle, paperback and as an audiobook. Find out more at: www.BookTitleGenerator.net

Watch the book trailer here: https://bit.ly/BookTitleGeneratorTrailer

Listen to a sample of the audiobook here: http://bit.ly/AudioSampleBookTitleGen

The Bottom Line: Take your time and use my proven system in naming your book!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Book Marketing, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book.

He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net Join the 45K+ authors and writers who follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist