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Book Publicist Scott Lorenz offers Authors Book Marketing Tips and Techniques on his Blog “The Book Publicist”

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How Editing, Copyediting, and Proofreading Make Your Book Shine

To Write Is Human, To Edit Is Divine.” – Stephen King

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

How Editing, Copyediting, and Proofreading Make Your Book Shine

How Editing, Copyediting, and Proofreading Make Your Book Shine

You’ve finally finished your book and are ready to get it into the hands of the reader. You’ve crafted each sentence with great intention, choosing each word to communicate your meaning. This manuscript has spent countless hours with your eyes on it and multiple people have read it for you. You’ve rewritten and revised, incorporated their suggestions and there couldn’t possibly be anything else that needs changing or correcting.

Is it still necessary to hire a professional editor or proofreader? What if the editor has a different vision from you and suggests sweeping changes to your work? What if the editor doesn’t like, or even worse, doesn’t understand your book?

Writing a book is an amazing accomplishment, one that less than 1% of the world’s population will ever manage to do. Given the amount of time, energy, and creativity you’ve invested to bring your ideas to life, your finished manuscript is of high personal value. Your work could even be life changing for some readers, if it can reach them. Capturing an audience is no picnic and whether you are publishing traditionally or self-publishing, the competition is fierce.

At this point, your manuscript is like a raw diamond. A diamond in its natural, raw state is full of potential, both in beauty and in value. Yet without taking it to a gem expert, it can be difficult to know how much more value could be added with precise cutting and polishing. Professional gemcutters spend years honing their craft and know exactly what to do to bring forth the maximum beauty of the diamond and increase its market value.

Like gemcutters, editors and proofreaders are experts with a refined skill set. They can evaluate your book and make recommendations about which editing processes the manuscript should undergo. Their extensive training allows them to view your book differently than a casual reader and identify errors or issues with the flow, organization, or plot of the story.

“All manuscripts need something,” says author Edward Renehan. As a book publicist, I’ve seen time and again where the attention of a professional editor has changed a good book into a brilliant one. Hiring an editor is like hiring a personal trainer; it’s still you, just faster, tighter, and more trim. Whether you’re getting a developmental edit, copyedit, or proofread, a professional editor knows how to identify your vision for your work and suggest changes to accomplish that vision.

Most importantly, they are on your team. The editor’s goal is to increase the value and marketability of your work—to cut, and polish in ways that make it shine even more brightly. In an article for Publisher’s Weekly, editor Leila Sales says, “We are as invested in the success of your book as you are. Furthermore, remember this: if we sign up books that don’t perform well, that reflects poorly on us as editors. The future of our careers depends on the success of the books we edit. We are never trying to sabotage your book, because we are emotionally and financially invested in how well it does.”

Regardless of your publishing path, one of the best ways to promote your book is to get reviews. In my experience, if your book has a number of noticeable errors many reviewers will find it difficult to look past them and give a fair review of the entire work. It makes the reading more difficult and creates a poor impression. Even if the reviewer knows that it’s a galley copy or ARC and hasn’t been final proofed, a manuscript in need of editing or proofreading simply will not get as strong or positive reviews.

As a third party endorsement of your work, reviews are critical for promotion and marketing efforts. They give the potential buyer assurance the book they may buy is worthwhile. Professional editing of your work will take your work to the next level, enabling you to get the best reviews possible from your reviewers. Better reviews increase the likelihood of getting your book the attention and audience it deserves.

Bottom Line: Let your finished work shine! Hire a professional editor or proofreader to polish your book, bring forth its maximum beauty, and increase its market value.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net

 

The Art and Power of Brevity for Authors

“If I Had More Time, I Would Have Written You a Shorter Letter.” – Mark Twain

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

Most authors know the famous adage, “Brevity is the soul of wit.” This saying is from Shakespeare’s Hamlet and is, ironically, delivered by the exceedingly longwinded character Polonius. Brevity, simply defined, is shortness or conciseness of expression. While brevity is often an essential part of wit or humor, it is also a necessary tool which writers must master. In an age where attention spans are under siege from competing information streams, skillful and brief communication can cut through the noise and capture the attention of the listener.

Mark Twain's Quote on the Power of Brevity for Authors

Mark Twain’s Quote on the Power of Brevity for Authors

Like Shakespeare’s Polonius, many authors recognize the importance of brevity, while struggling to actually be brief. Authors are conditioned early on with the idea that longer, more complex sentences and words are better. As people who enjoy the act of writing and are immersed in a world of words, it is easy for writers to become longwinded.

As a book publicist I bridge the gap between authors, who can be longwinded, and the media who have no time to listen or talk!  So it’s imperative that I condense everything down to the ‘elevator pitch’ answering these questions: Who is the author? What is their topic? Why should we interview them NOW?

William Zinsser, famous American writer, literary critic, and teacher said, “There are four basic premises of writing: clarity, brevity, simplicity, and humanity.” Words carry power, but length does not equal strength. Some of the most powerful and most memorable works in human history are only a few dozen words:

The Lord’s Prayer: 66 words

The Ten Commandments: 79 words

The Gettysburg Address: 272 words

Declaration of Independence: 1,322 words

Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech: 1,667 words

Thomas Jefferson once said, “The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” Here are three important practices for writers:

  • Know the purpose of your communication. An elevator pitch or logline will be shorter than a synopsis or an excerpt. Whether writing a pitch or working on your novel, keep in mind the purpose of the writing and consider how brevity can help meet that goal.
  • Remove unnecessary words. Even Jefferson’s famous quote about brevity can be reduced to the following statement, without changing the meaning. “The most valuable talent is never using two words when one will do.”
  • Change the sentence structure. Revising the structure of the sentence may eliminate words and possibly even express the idea more powerfully.

Author Dennis Roth says, “If it takes a lot of words to say what you have in mind, give it more thought.” Thoughtfully implementing these practices will help you eliminate the fluff and maximize the impact of your writing.

One area in which authors typically struggle, but which is an excellent exercise in brevity, is crafting elevator pitches and loglines. Pitches and loglines are a marketing tool to help sell your idea or work, and attract the interest of publishers, editors, or producers. Having a refined a pitch or logline can also help authors maintain focus during the writing process, becoming a tool which keeps the author from getting tangled in the weeds of extraneous details that can detract from the story.

An elevator pitch or logline succinctly answers the question: “What is your book about?” and provides a tease or a taste of the story. Loglines encapsulate the story arc and themes in one to two well-crafted sentences. The pitch should evoke the curiosity of the listener, help them understand what sets your work apart, and compel them to want more. Loglines and elevator pitches should SELL the story, not tell the story.

As a writer, brevity is your friend. Brief, simple, and concise communication shows respect for the listener and their time. Utilize brevity to help your writing get the attention it deserves.

I could blather on in this article but in keeping with the title… I am going to be brief!

Bottom Line: Be brief. Master the art of brevity to make your writing more powerful and effective.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net

 

The Top Writers’ Conferences for 2021 by Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

If you are a serious writer with high aspirations, then you’ll want to go to a writers’ conference. Want to meet authors and exchange ideas, tips and techniques? Then sign up for a writer’s conference today.

A writers’ conference is a think tank for authors to build on each other’s ideas and inspire new achievements in their own work. For the cost of lodging and registration, the payoff for attending a writers’ conference could be tremendous.

Writers Conferences and Confabs are great place to learn about publishing and writing

Writers Conferences and Confabs are a great place to learn about publishing and writing from agents, publishers, authors and publicists.

Attending a writers’ conference gives you a chance to pitch your book, learn about the various publishing options and meet book editors, agents and book marketing specialists. If your book is six months or a year from being finished, you can talk to people with valuable input on shaping your book. At a writers’ conference, you’ll get all sorts of advice to help you wrap up your project when you return home.

Of course, you will want to prepare for any writers’ conference you attend by having a plan of what you want to find out and what you will do while there. I suggest you develop an ‘elevator pitch’ about your book that you can deliver in 30 seconds. Have a one-pager available with your book cover, author headshot, short 50-word synopsis, short bio, website URL, Twitter handle and your contact information. You never know who you’ll meet so be prepared for that moment!

Here are some upcoming writers’ conferences in 2021:

February 26-28, 2021 Asheville Christian Writers Conference (Asheville, NC) The Asheville Christian Writers Conference will offer one-on-one mentoring, writing workshops, and discussion groups. https://ashevillechristianwritersconference.com/

March 13, 2021: Atlanta Writing Workshop (Atlanta, GA) The title of the Atlanta Writing Workshop is “How to Get Published.” It focuses on classes and advice intended to help you get your works published. https://atlantawritingworkshop.com/

April 8-10 2021 Las Vegas Writers Conference (Las Vegas, NV) At the Las Vegas Writers Conference, writers can meet and learn from some of the greatest agents, authors, and professionals in publishing. https://lasvegaswritersconference.com/

April 9-10 2021: Michigan Writers Conference (Detroit, MI) At this writers conference, participants will enjoy a day of intense instruction on how to get their works published. https://michiganwritingworkshop.com/

April 21-25 2021: The Muse & the Marketplace Writers Conference (Boston, MA) Here you’ll find over 130 interactive sessions led by authors as well as a happy hour session where you can network with agents, publishers, and authors. https://museandthemarketplace.com/

April 23-25 2021: Pikes Peak Writers Conference (Virtual) Pikes Peak Writers Conference will be held virtually this year. Writers can participate in workshops taught by subject matter experts and listen to keynote speakers. https://pikespeakwriters.com

April 24-May 1, 2021: Northern Colorado Writers Conference (Fort Collins, CO) The Northern Colorado Writers Conference will hold workshops, sessions, and four-hour master classes to inspire authors. https://northerncoloradowriters.com/Conference

May 7-9, 2021: Atlanta Writers Conference (Atlanta, GA) The Atlanta Writers Conference offers one-on-one manuscript sample critiques, pitch sessions, and workshops. https://atlantawritersconference.com

May 13-15, 2021: Storymakers Conference (Provo, UT) The Storymakers Conference will consist of various classes that cover various topics such as cover design, marketing, creating a writing business, and the nuts and bolts of screenwriting. http://ldstorymakersconference.com/

June 21-26, 2021: Minnesota Northwoods Writers Conference (Bemidji, MN) This writing conference is full of workshops, Q&A sessions, panel talks. https://www.northwoodswriters.org/

July 18-25, 2021: Port Townsend Writers Conference (Port Townsend, WA) The Port Townsend Writers Conference will feature guided free writes as well as readings and lectures by contemporary writers in the heart of the Pacific Northwest. https://centrum.org/the-port-townsend-writers-conference/

August 1-6, 2021: Napa Valley Writers Conference (St. Helena, CA) At the Napa Valley Writers Conference, writers can participate in small workshops related to poetry, fiction, or translation that meet for two hours daily over a five day period. http://www.napawritersconference.org

August 5-7, 2021: Mendocino Coast Writers Conference (Mendocino, CA) At this conference, writers can participate in morning workshops that are related to various genres. http://mcwc.org/

August 19-22, 2021: Killer Nashville Writers Conference (Franklin, TN) Writers who attend the Killer Nashville Writers Conference can expect writing workshops, pitch sessions, panel discussions, author signings, and a book fair. https://www.newpages.com/writing-conferences/killer-nashville

October 15-17, 2021: Emerald City Writers Conference (Bellevue, WA) The Emerald City Writers Conference will offer workshops, pitch appointments, agent and editor panels, and happy hour socialization opportunities. https://gsrwa.org/home/emerald-city-writers-conference/

October 22-24, 2021: La Jolla Writers Conference (San Diego, CA) At the La Jolla Writers Conference, writers can attend two types of classes: 50-minute lecture sessions or  110-minute workshops. https://lajollawritersconference.com

November 8-11, 2021: Kauai Writers Conference (Kauai, HI) At the Kauai Writers Conference, writers can enjoy four days of master classes, small group discussions, and individual sessions with literary agents. https://kauaiwritersconference.com/

Select a writers’ conference of interest to you and be prepared to enjoy the benefits of meeting other writers. You may acquire knowledge you can use immediately, find a new market for your book, elevate your professional effectiveness, meet editors, agents and publishers, become inspired and return home energized.

The Bottom Line: Take a little working vacation and hit some writers’ conferences. Make it a priority to sign up for one in the coming weeks and months. You’ll be glad you did!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net

 

Authors: Use Alliteration for Illumination of Your Book Title

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Alliteration is just one of the topics covered in Book Title Generator, a proven system in naming your book

Alliteration is just one of the topics covered in Book Title Generator, a proven system in naming your book

Alliteration is a very useful literary tool. Alliteration is simply defined as the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words and also the repetition of an initial consonant sound, as in “a peck of pickled peppers.”

Alliteration is one of many tips and techniques covered in my new book designed to help authors title their books called BOOK TITLE GENERATOR.

Incorporating alliteration into your book title can help people remember your work and it will stick out in people’s minds. Here are a few examples of books with alliteration in their titles:

The Teeny Tiny Teacher by Stephanie Calmenson

The Magical, Mystical, Marvelous Coat by Catherine Ann Cullen

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Book Title Generator

Nobody buys a book unless they’re first attracted by the title and cover. If the title doesn’t grab them it’s game over.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Love’s Labor’s Lost by William Shakespeare

The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

The Princess and the Pea by Hans Christian Andersen

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Caesar and Cleopatra by George Bernard Shaw

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John le Carré

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Roger Parker of Personal Branding says “Sometimes the most important lessons in personal branding are the simplest ones, like using alliteration, or repeated “hard” sounds, to make the title of your brand-building book stand out and be easy to remember.” You want readers, fans, and your potential audience to enjoy your book’s title. Alliteration can help that title roll off the tongue nicely. If your book’s title is memorable and fun or easy to say, people will talk about it. The alliteration will stand out in conversation or in the review section of a website.

According to Mike Ball, author of ‘Banjos, Boats and Butt Dialing’, alliteration can be a very effective tool for a humorist. Ball explains, “I rarely use it for serious subjects but judiciously used, alliteration is an author’s best friend. Since humor is all about timing, alliteration forces the reader to participate in the timing you are trying to set up. That’s why my book title ‘Banjos, Boats and Butt Dialing’ gets people to laugh before they crack the cover.”

As J.R.R. Tolkien observed, alliteration “depends not on letters but on sounds.” Thus the phrase know-nothing is alliterative, but climate change is not.”

Domey Malasarn from the website “The Literary Lab” feels that alliteration can belong in titles as well as within your book. “I have used it on occasion myself in places where I thought it was helpful. For example, if I had a sentence like ‘Alfred was furious.’ I might revise it to “Alfred was angry.” because to me it pairs the subject of the sentence with his emotion a little more powerfully.”

Puja Lalwani of Buzzle explains, “The importance of alliteration should not be undermined as just another literary device that is beyond comprehension. It is highly useful and most invaluable, whether just to drive a point home, make for a fun read, or as a marketing tool that will leave your product etched in the mind of the consumer.”

On the website, helium.com, Stella McIntyre perfectly outlines the benefits of using alliteration across various mediums. “Although most commonly used in literature, most particularly poetry, alliteration can also be found in non-fiction writing: leaflets, newspaper headlines, advertising and merchandising. Its effect is twofold. Firstly it draws attention to and emphasizes a phrase and secondly, it can create connotations that significantly add to the understanding and enjoyment of a writer’s meaning.”

The Bottom Line: Alliteration in book titles will help people remember your book title because it will help your work stand out and engage your reader.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net

 

Authors- Meet the World’s Best Writers in MasterClass

MasterClass Review: Take your writing skills to the next level with online courses from the authors who have perfected the craft.

 By Scott Lorenz Westwind Communications

One of my favorite things for authors is MasterClass. Imagine having a one-on-one lesson with the best writers of our day. That’s what you get when James Patterson speaks to you directly in his MasterClass. Same with Dan Brown, Malcolm Gladwell and many other bestselling authors.

MasterClass Review- James Patterson, Dan Brown, Malcolm Gladwell

MasterClass is an invaluable resource especially if you’d like to improve your writing skills and succeed as an author.

I’ve gained much insight from these top writers who are eager to share their methods and thought processes. MasterClass is an invaluable resource especially if you’d like to improve your writing skills and succeed as an author. It offers seemingly endless engaging online courses taught by some of the best authors in the world. Don’t worry, there’s no test either, just good helpful info.

These authors know what it takes to write a unique, compelling book that sells. They’re dedicated to their craft and are generous in sharing their knowledge and insight with you. Here’s a closer look at the various courses you can take. Click on the link to watch a customized trailer for each.

Neil Gaiman- The author of Coraline and The Sandman shares his unique approach to storytelling. With his course, you can find your voice, come up with exciting ideas, and give your characters life.

James Patterson- If anyone is in a position to help you start and finish your book, it’s James Patterson. He’s the author of 19 consecutive No. 1 New York Times bestsellers and shares a variety of tips in his course. “My first novel was turned down by 31 publishers. It’s rare that somebody comes up with a totally fresh idea out of nowhere. Write the story. Don’t write sentences,” said Patterson.

Malcolm Gladwell- Outliers and The Tipping Point are two of Malcolm Gladwell’s books that have allowed readers to understand complicated ideas such as performance prediction and behavioral economics. Gladwell can teach you how to write powerful stories that help others learn. “The job of the writer is not to supply the ideas. It’s to be patient enough to find the ideas.” he explained.

Dan Brown- Known for The Da Vinci Code and other best-selling thrillers, Dan Brown reveals how he turns ideas into narratives. Find out how he researches, comes up with characters and keeps suspense throughout all of his books. “Write as though nobody’s watching because nobody’s watching,” said Brown.

Margaret Atwood– When it comes to creative writing, Margaret Atwood is the expert. She’s the author of The Handmaid’s Tale and provides a roadmap for developing ideas into novels that attract and inspire all kinds of readers. Atwood is a firm believer of the idea that you become a writer by writing.

David Sedaris- David Sedaris is well-respected for his bestselling books like Calypso and essays in the New Yorker. His course can teach you the art of personal storytelling. Learn how to use humor to write openings that pique interest and endings that satisfy readers.

Joyce Carol Oates- Become a better short story writer with Joyce Carol Oates who’s published 58 novels and thousands of short stories. She’s a creative writing professor at Princeton University and will teach you how to explore your own imagination and write works that people want to read.

R.L. Stine- If you want to write for young audiences, R.L. Stine can steer you in the right direction. For over 20 years, Stine focused on funny stories and jokes. He eventually transitioned to writing horror stories for youngsters and is best known for The Fear Street and Goosebumps series. You can count on him to show you how to develop plots that intrigue young readers.

Billy Collins- With Billy Collins’ poetry course, you can find your voice as a poet and appreciate “the emotional pull of poetry.” Collins is a former U.S. Poet Laureate who will read his poems out loud and explain how he wrote them.

The Bottom Line: If you want to become an outstanding author then master the craft of writing from the most successful authors through MasterClass.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz-  Book publicist

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net