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“Here’s How to Find a Hollywood Agent” says Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

“Here’s How to Find a Hollywood Agent” says Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

These days, more and more authors want to turn their books into movies. This is no surprise as streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime are more popular today than ever before and always in need of fresh content.

So the question is, how can you connect with a Hollywood agent who can turn your dream into a reality? Below is my list of all the tips, tricks, and resources you need to do just that. No matter what strategies you utilize, be patient. Remember, Hollywood movies don’t make their debut overnight. It will take a great deal of time, creativity, and persistence for your book to reach movie status.

Dr. Ken Atchity, a literary manager who developed The Meg stated that Walt Disney Studios bought the rights to the book in the 1990’s. It didn’t get produced until Warner Brothers did it in 2014. Allan Scott, the producer of the Queen’s Gambit revealed it took 30 years, and 9 rewrites for the movie to come to life. The moral of the story? Never give up.

Write a Script First

Hollywood agents want to see how your book has the potential to become a top movie. That’s why it’s a good idea to write a script yourself. With a well-written script, you’re far more likely to spark interest and inspire those in Hollywood. This is the first step you should take before you look for people to pitch to. If script writing is not your skill set, then hire it out. Here’s an article I wrote about that option. How to Get Your Book Adapted into a Screenplay.

Use a Matchmaking Service

If you were looking for someone to date, a matchmaking service might be a good option. The same holds true if you’re in search of a Hollywood agent. While there are a number of matchmaking services out there, here are my top picks.

  • Greenlight My Movie: This should be on your radar if you have a short film, book, screenplay, or true story. You’ll get a guaranteed response from Hollywood buyers and representatives.
  • Hollywood Pitch Festival: Head on over to the Hollywood Pitch Festival and pitch your book to A-list buyers and representatives.
  • InkTip: You can use InkTip to get your script noticed. It’s been around since 2000 and is currently used by thousands of producers, agents, managers and other pros in the industry.
  • Spec Scout: After you submit your script to Spec Scout, you’ll receive detailed comments on its strengths and weaknesses. If you score above 75 on a 100 point scale, you’ll be listed as a “Scouted” writer and may land some great exposure.

Be Cautious of Trends

All too often a successful movie comes out and writers try to write a similar story with their own twist. The truth is that Hollywood agents don’t want to see the same ol’ plots. Do your best to keep your book original. While it’s easier said than done to think out of the box, doing so is essential if you’d like to stand out.

Ask Agents If They Can Take a Look

It may be tempting to simply send your script to several of agents. According to Richard Walter, UCLA’s screenplay expert, this strategy will likely send your message to the trash. Instead, send an intro letter or email to these agents where you introduce yourself. Then, ask them if they’re willing to take a look at your script. If you get a reply like “go for it,” congratulations, your foot is in the door.

Network, Network, Network

According to Daniel Parsons, bestselling author of several series, networking is the key to finding a Hollywood agent who is interested in your work. Attend writer’s conferences, festivals, and a variety of social events. When you do, be prepared with your short elevator pitch. You never know who you may meet and you only get one chance to make a first impression.

Rank Highly on Amazon Books

Let’s be honest. If you’re popular on Amazon, your chances of getting noticed by Hollywood agents and movie producers are pretty high. While it will take a great deal of effort and determination, do your best to get your book ranked in the top 1% of Amazon Books. This worked for self-published author, Colleen Houck whose book Tiger’s Curse is currently being turned into a movie.

Connect with Agents on LinkedIn and Facebook

There are many authors out there who already have established relationships with Hollywood agents so it only makes sense to find them on Facebook or connect with them on LinkedIn. Harness the power of social media.

Use IMDbPro

Keep your finger on the pulse of Hollywood by looking at a list of directors who’ve been nominated for awards and see which agents represent them and who repped the originating book. Keep up to date on changes in representation with IMDbPro Track. IMDb is THE place to be. Study it. You can find anybody in the film business with IMDb.”

Enter Your Book in Screenplay Competitions

Caren Lisssner’s book “Carrie Pilby” was turned into a film starring Nathan Lane by a Hollywood film director and three producers. She encourages authors to take advantage of screenplay competitions because you never know what will happen. I use FilmFreeway to submit my client’s screenplays to dozens of the thousands of film festivals worldwide. My clients have won 100+ awards worldwide. When we get a win Westwind Book Marketing sends out a press release.

Embrace the Roadblocks

One of my clients, Jonathan Sanger, penned a memoir called “The Making of the Elephant Man, A Producer’s Memoir” He tells the story of the screenplay he received from his children’s babysitter and how he eventually turned it into a classic movie. Sanger explains all of the hardships that he was faced with along the way and how he overcame them.

The Bottom Line: Your book or screenplay will not turn itself into a movie. You must place it in front of the right eyes. An agent can help you do it. Good luck!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at  https://westwindbookmarketing.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


18 Literary Agents Reveal “How to Land a Book Deal”

Literary Agents Spill The Beans

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Whether you’re a new author or have been on the New York Times Bestseller List for years, literary agents are likely top of mind. After all, these professionals may be just what you need to get published or take your career to the next level. A quality agent can review your manuscript and help you land a lucrative book deal.

Since literary agents are so integral to success, I came up with this revealing compilation of interviews with literary agents. Tune in and prepare to be inspired! Sometimes all that it takes is a little insight into the process that can help you gain a competitive edge and succeed in your writing career.

1. Jeff Herman

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0F4vvTWG74)

Jeff Herman is a well-respected agent and the author of “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents.” He entered book publishing in his mid 20s when he didn’t have much experience. Since he had to figure out a lot on his own, he wrote this book to steer new authors in the right direction. In my opinion, investing in this book is a must, no matter where you are in your career. Once you read it, you’ll find it well worth the money.

Jeff Herman

2. Brooks Sherman

(https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2116395441773699)

Brooks Sherman shares what he looks for in a query letter. He explains that the most effective letters focus on plot and character rather than themes or messages. In addition, he likes to learn about a writer’s educational background as well as details about any past publications and writer’s workshops they’ve participated in.

Brooks Sherman

3. Mollie Glick

(https://sobookingcool.com/2018/09/12/interview-with-literary-agent-mollie-glick/)

Mollie Glick states that she loves her job as a literacy agent because it challenges her to figure out how to push messages that are worth sharing into the world. She often reaches out to authors who have accomplished something that is incredibly inspirational or post something that sparks an interesting conversation.

Mollie Glick

4. Sallyanne Sweeney

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEoU5xA6HeY)

Sallyanne Sweeney explains that she enjoys working with writers on manuscripts that they might have been working on for years. She loves to see the transformation from an initial idea to a finished book and being involved in every aspect of the publishing process.

Sallyanne Sweeney

5. Howard Yoon

(https://www.rossyoon.com/howard-yoon)

Howard Yoon explains that the process of working with an author is a lot like dating. During the first couple of meetings, you’re not sure if things are going to work out. When it actually does work, everything clicks. Yoon chooses books he believes have a valuable contribution to the world.

Howard Yoon

6. Mark Gottlieb

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sQGSPrdaA8)

Mark Gottlieb talks about how authors can go about finding agents. He says that authors should always aim high and think highly of themselves. Gottlieb recommends Publishers Marketplace, which ranks publishers by number of book deals and lets you filter your search by genre.

Mark Gottlieb

7. Alyssa Jennette

(https://www.facebook.com/cardinalrulepress/videos/1158824181170762)

Alyssa Jennette talks about what authors should do before seeking an agent. She suggests they send their work to a critique group, an editor, or another professional so they can look it over and provide feedback before it gets in front of an agent. This way it’ll be as ready for publishing as possible.

Alyssa Jennette

8. Jessica Reino

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM-Y8xucJsE)

Jessica Reino reinforces the fact that every author is unique so it’s important to write what you want to write and edit your work the way you see fit. She also discusses Twitter and other social media platforms, which she highly recommends to nonfiction authors. Reino notes that if you’re going to create social media outlets, only do so if you’re going to actively use them.

Jessica Reino

9. Eva Scalzo

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL0vYbcgohY)

Eva Scalzo encourages her authors to tell her which editors and publishers they’d like to work with as many have specific preferences. She advises them on what they need to know about these professionals and organizations and helps them come up with a back up plan.

Eva Scalzo

10. Katie Greenstreet

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rr6d0X2P7k)

Katie Greenstreet explains that she looks for a very unique voice in the first chapter. She loves quirky narrators and will always be drawn to something that she hasn’t seen before. Greenstreet also wants to know that an author truly understands the big picture of their work and conveys it clearly in their synopsis.

Katie Greenstreet

11. Jim McCarthy

(http://www.middlegradeninja.com/2020/08/middle-grade-ninja-episode-88-literary.html)

Jim McCarthy explains that there are plenty of great books but he can’t represent them for the sole reason that he doesn’t have the editorial vision for them. He reinforces the fact that authors should find agents that are worthy of them.

Jim McCarthy

12. Stephen Barbara

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2ymzI9EcLk)

Stephen Barbara reveals that his role as an agent is a combination of support, advocacy, and a little bit of therapy. He also explains that he likes query letters that prove writers have done their research and know who he is and what he’s done in the past.

Stephen Barbara

13. Broo Doherty

(https://vimeo.com/511534956)

Broo Doherty discusses general questions about literary agents and gives insight about what it’s like to be an agent. She also dives deep into what she’s looking for in new clients and how she manages her existing client base.

Broo Doherty

14. Ted Weinstein

(https://vimeo.com/18828443)

Ted Weinstein states that the keys to success for any author come down to two things: marketability and personal passion. He also encourages authors to do their research when looking for agents and recommends a few great books for them to read.

Ted Weinstein

15. Davinia Andrew-Lynch

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kRN33R_Y68)

Davinia Andrew-Lynch goes over the typical day of a literary agent. She explains that every day is different. Some days are packed with meetings while others are filled with editing manuscripts. There are also days reserved for admin work like sorting through contracts and consulting with designers about covers.

Davinia Andrew-Lynch

16. Donald Maass

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BhFf27agew)

Renowned agent Donald Maass founded the Donald Maass Literary Agency in 1980. His agency sells more than 150 novels to major publishers on a national and global level. He states that he tries to articulate why a certain plot or character isn’t working to truly help authors.

Donald Maass

17. Andrea Somberg

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axgOKH-2p8o)

Andrea Somberg has been a literary agent for over 15 years and represents several New York Times best selling authors. In this hour-long interview, she discusses a number of topics, including what draws her to queries, what types of authors succeed, and how new authors can grow their careers.

Andrea Somberg

18. Chip MacGregor

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PeuQOd5bIg)

Chip MacGregor has represented many big time authors including Brennan Manning, Vincent Zandri, Rachel Hauck, Mindy Clark, Irene Hannon, Bonnie Gray, and Michelle McKinney. In this interview, he talks about the changing world of publishing, primarily in the Christian market.

Chip MacGregor

The Bottom Line: Watch these literary agent interviews. Take notes. Even if they don’t represent your genre they can offer you insight into the process of “Getting A BOOK DEAL.”

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

There’s nothing sweeter than a romance novel in movie form. If you’ve written a romantic comedy, you may be wondering what it takes to get it turned into a Hallmark movie. Fortunately, the Hallmark Channel clearly outlines the steps you must take to bring your heartwarming work to its audience. Here’s an overview of what it entails.

Understand the Hallmark Channel’s Ideal Novels

Hallmark looks for uplifting and inspirational novels related to romantic love, family love, and love between friends. The ideal story ranges from 75,000 to 90,000 words with relatable characters that overcome conflict and an ending filled with hope and happiness. While Hallmark’s stories typically take place in the U.S. the channel is open to American stories overseas.

When it comes to contemporary romance, Hallmark is most interested in beach settings, Valentine’s Day and Christmas stories, laugh-out-loud romance comedies, novels with a unique time element as well as those that involve brothers or male best friends. The Hallmark channel is open to all types of submissions so don’t be afraid to intrigue them with something that’s not on their list.

It’s important to note that Hallmark does steer away from paranormal romance, romantic suspense, young adult, new adult romance, and religious romance. As of 2022, they’re not interested in cozy mysteries. Also, novels with sex, nudity, profanity, or violence are not permitted. The extent of the physical interaction in your story should be hugging and kissing.

Submit Your Rom-Com in the Proper Format

The Hallmark Channel asks that you submit one MSWord document with a four-to-five page synopsis and a second document with the first three chapters of your novel. Make sure your submission is in Times New Roman font, size 12, and double spaced. Also, add the title, genre, and actual or estimated final word count to the subject line. Check the Hallmark website to learn more about the deadline for your submission and where to send it.

Learn From Other Authors

There have been many authors who have been able to turn their rom-coms into Hallmark movies, so it only makes sense to turn to them for some advice. Denise Hunter’s novel The Convenient Groom made it to Hallmark. It’s about a young celebrity marriage counselor that gets left at the altar of her own highly publicized wedding.

“Publish your novels through a publisher that actively seeks movie deals. I’m sure there are many ways producers “find” novels. But in my case, it was through HarperCollins Christian Publishing, whose rights department routinely pitches their novels for film rights,” Hunter says.

“Utilize a romance trope; they’re popular for a reason. If you can take a trope and spin it in a fresh way, all the better. The Convenient Groom is, of course, a modern-day marriage of convenience story,” she adds.

Tracy Andreen is another noteworthy author who wrote six films produced for Hallmark, including Snow Bride, Picture a Perfect Christmas, and It’s Christmas Eve. When asked what her secret sauce to success is, she replied with, “Being professional. When given a deadline, I do everything in my power to deliver on that deadline, especially as the time to start production nears.”

In addition to meeting deadlines, she says that it’s important to love what you do. “I love what I do and am beyond grateful for the opportunity to be able to do it, but at the end of the day it’s still work . . . awesome work I love, so I’m thrilled to do so and, hopefully, that shines through,” Andreen explains.

There’s also Jenny Hale whose novel Christmas Wishes & Mistletoe Kisses got picked by Hallmark. “It seems like romance is easy to write, but it’s a very careful dance between making it magical while also creating scenes and characters that feel real and relatable,” she says.

“People have told me for years that my books would be perfect for a Hallmark movie,” says bestselling romance author Pamela Gossiaux. “So this year I submitted my book The Scent of Love, a sweet, small town romance about the owner of a candle and gift shop, and the handsome man who rents the cottage on the shore. I love the type of books and movies that Hallmark produces. They’re the perfect escape!”

The Bottom Line: The Hallmark Channel produces 90+ holiday and romance films per year. With creativity, persistence, and passion, your novel may be one of them!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


The Editor’s Role in Successful Book Publishing

Hiring an editor

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

As a book publicist, I have a unique perspective in the publishing process and see the many roles that contribute to the success of a book. Some books are masterpieces ready to be promoted while others have issues that slow down the process and kill a project’s momentum.  Because I work so closely with the final product, I have a good understanding of what can make or break a book.

Besides book marketing, one of the most important things you can do as an author is to make sure an editor is a member of your team.

Authors and editors are two very different jobs. Both of these roles are equally important to book creation. However, when an author is their own editor, the lines that distinguish the two jobs can easily get blurred, and the quality of work ultimately suffers. Nothing quite compares to a book that has been properly edited with a fine-tooth comb. A polished manuscript creates potential for a much better book marketing experience overall.

The Editor’s Role on a Book Publishing Team

“Nothing detracts from good writing like bad editing,” says Debra Englander, an experienced non-fiction editor and writer. “Submit your best work. Have it copy-edited and proofread by a professional. Don’t ruin your reputation because of preventable mistakes.”  Englander served as editorial director at John Wiley Publishing for nearly 17 years and was on the receiving end of thousands of pitches from agents and authors. She currently works with authors on creating winning book proposals and editing manuscripts.

In an interview with author Jane Thurnell-Read discussing how to get a book published, Englander stressed the importance of the division of labor within a book. An editor provides the objectivity that one lacks when reviewing their own work. Their job isn’t to change the meaning of a book, but rather to make it better. Englander said authors can’t always tell what a scene is lacking, or if it’s clear enough to someone who’s unfamiliar with the subject matter.  After all, perception is just as important as intention in the world of book publishing.

Ensure Your Book is Publisher-Ready

An editor can clean up the original content and make awkward sentence structure and grammatical errors much less likely. These details can throw off the flow of a book and create obstacles for the reader’s comprehension. Those types of unfavorable features will likely be noticed early on in a publishing attempt and could very well result in rejection.

With over 25 years of editorial experience, Tiffany Yates Martin understands how to make the publishing process better for everyone involved. “Reputable, competent editors will save authors immense amounts of time and agony in deepening, developing, and polishing their stories, and can often give authors a leg up in attracting the attention of agents and editors, and make their stories more salable.”

Her extensive work with publishing houses such as New York Times and Writer’s Digest, has left her with the belief that editing is the most important part of the writing process. “Editing and revision are the real work of writing—and often where the story is fully found and developed and the magic happens…Because most authors were never taught this fact—nor how to edit and revise—many get disheartened when their first draft isn’t publisher-ready, or when the revision process may be more demanding or difficult than they expected. That’s not a reflection of your talent or skill but a completely normal part of the process for nearly all authors, at all levels of experience and skill,” explains Martin.

Before your book is introduced to a publisher, it needs to go through a rigorous editing process. Although being your own editor may sound enticing, no author is above hiring an editor. As Tiffany Yates Martin says, “Even editors need editors.”

Good Editing Leads to Successful Book Marketing

Aspiring authors sometimes fear that an editor will make their work less authentic, but I’ve found the opposite to be true. Hiring an editor is like hiring a personal trainer; it’s still you just faster, tighter and more trim. The work can still get done without one, but it’s a much more tedious process. Because of its time-consuming nature, refined writing needs multiple sets of eyes to ensure that everything on paper is intentional.

There is no shame in working with multiple people to ensure the highest quality of work. In fact, it’s highly encouraged. Publisher’s Weekly points out that grammatical errors are far too common to cut out entirely, but an effort to minimize them must be made. “The writer’s primary task is to create work that is as compelling and error-free as possible. A great book cover, a marketing plan, and a cool author website are all important,” they say, “but if an author hasn’t spent the time and money for a solid editing job, it’s all just wasted effort.” Good book marketing and publicity can only do so much; the true quality of the book is essential to its success.

The Bottom Line: Authors, give yourself the best shot at success; hire an editor. Together, you can create the absolute best version of your work.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and book marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book.

He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at http://www.book-marketing-expert.com  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 734-667-2090. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist


There’s No Time Like the Present to Write Your Book

No Time Like the Present to Write Your Book

“In the Midst of Every Crisis, Lies Great Opportunity.” – Albert Einstein

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Without a doubt, the past two years were some of the strangest in recent history and it is likely the changes brought by the global pandemic may persist well into the future. Our daily rhythms of work, school, and life are altered and contact with others is now masked, distanced, and sanitized. So much is still unknown about the way things will unfold, and it is uncertain when life will return to “normal” and what that will look like.

Three Reasons To Write Your Book

Whatever may be happening in your life, as a book publicist, I’d like to encourage you that in spite of these challenges, NOW may be the perfect time to write your book. Here are three reasons:

1. Historically, many books have been inspired by the uncertainty of a pandemic. John F. Kennedy once said, “When written in Chinese, the word crisis is composed of two characters – one represents danger, and the other represents opportunity.” Creativity rises to the forefront in times of upheaval or danger. Great works of literature, including Shakespeare’s King Lear, were produced during periods of epidemic and plague. Other “pandemic literature” such as The Plague (Albert Camus), Twilight in Delhi (Ahmed Ali), The Andromeda Strain (Michael Crichton), Survivor (Octavia E. Butler) and Station Eleven (Emily St. John Mandel), seize moments like ours to tell fascinating stories. The best and worst aspects of humanity are vividly displayed against the literary backdrop of chaos brought by illness and epidemic. Even if your work is not directly inspired by the pandemic, it could one day serve as an example of art produced during a critical period in world history.

2. Writing can provide a pleasurable means of relieving pandemic induced stress. In times of stress, the act of writing can be therapeutic, becoming an outlet for pressure and anxiety brought by unexpected change. It is a way to both reflect on what is happening and try to bring meaning from it. Writing a book and the research and organization involved keep the mind active, so that learning continues no matter what else in your life may have changed.

In an interview with GQ, author Ottessa Moshfegh says,

It’s the mind organizing the details of life into a narrative that logically orients the writer back to her own story. […] In some ways, this quarantine is the ideal creative environment. Writing takes patience and listening, allowing oneself to linger on a word or image or gesture and watch it develop into drama through a language of its own. It also takes a lot of time. […] I’m trying to see this period as a blessing in that way. The light side of the darkness.

3. Book sales are strong. While many industries have been heavily impacted by the pandemic, book sales have increased. After an initial slump during the spring of 2020, the book market made a strong recovery, with Jim Milliot of Publisher’s Weekly reporting an 8.2% rise in the sale of print books. Elizabeth A. Harris of the New York Times reports that 2020 brought increases of 17% for audio book sales and 16% for eBook sales. With many normal activities suspended and screen time at an all time high for both adults and children, books remain a great low-tech option for entertainment.

Author Dave Pelzer once said, “Something good comes out of every crisis.” Writing your book now may not only help you by giving you an outlet and a goal to attain, but may also one day inspire future generations to meet the challenges they face with creativity and bravery.

Bottom Line: Times of change are times of opportunity. Seize the day, write your book, and let it be one of the good things that come out of this crisis.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at http://www.Book-Marketing-Expert.com or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 734-667-2090. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Is there a strategy in naming your book? YES! Check out Scott’s new award winning book for authors called: BOOK TITLE GENERATOR at http://www.BookTitleGenerator.org