fbpx

Book Publicist Scott Lorenz offers Authors Book Marketing Tips and Techniques on his Blog “The Book Publicist”

woman
Authors, want publicity?
Get ALL the publicity your book deserves, and MORE!
> GET A TOP BOOK PUBLICIST,
SCOTT LORENZ

How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

How to Get Your Book Turned Into a Hallmark Movie

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

There’s nothing sweeter than a romance novel in movie form. If you’ve written a romantic comedy, you may be wondering what it takes to get it turned into a Hallmark movie. Fortunately, the Hallmark Channel clearly outlines the steps you must take to bring your heartwarming work to its audience. Here’s an overview of what it entails.

Understand the Hallmark Channel’s Ideal Novels

Hallmark looks for uplifting and inspirational novels related to romantic love, family love, and love between friends. The ideal story ranges from 75,000 to 90,000 words with relatable characters that overcome conflict and an ending filled with hope and happiness. While Hallmark’s stories typically take place in the U.S. the channel is open to American stories overseas.

When it comes to contemporary romance, Hallmark is most interested in beach settings, Valentine’s Day and Christmas stories, laugh-out-loud romance comedies, novels with a unique time element as well as those that involve brothers or male best friends. The Hallmark channel is open to all types of submissions so don’t be afraid to intrigue them with something that’s not on their list.

It’s important to note that Hallmark does steer away from paranormal romance, romantic suspense, young adult, new adult romance, and religious romance. As of 2022, they’re not interested in cozy mysteries. Also, novels with sex, nudity, profanity, or violence are not permitted. The extent of the physical interaction in your story should be hugging and kissing.

Submit Your Rom-Com in the Proper Format

The Hallmark Channel asks that you submit one MSWord document with a four-to-five page synopsis and a second document with the first three chapters of your novel. Make sure your submission is in Times New Roman font, size 12, and double spaced. Also, add the title, genre, and actual or estimated final word count to the subject line. Check the Hallmark website to learn more about the deadline for your submission and where to send it.

Learn From Other Authors

There have been many authors who have been able to turn their rom-coms into Hallmark movies, so it only makes sense to turn to them for some advice. Denise Hunter’s novel The Convenient Groom made it to Hallmark. It’s about a young celebrity marriage counselor that gets left at the altar of her own highly publicized wedding.

“Publish your novels through a publisher that actively seeks movie deals. I’m sure there are many ways producers “find” novels. But in my case, it was through HarperCollins Christian Publishing, whose rights department routinely pitches their novels for film rights,” Hunter says.

“Utilize a romance trope; they’re popular for a reason. If you can take a trope and spin it in a fresh way, all the better. The Convenient Groom is, of course, a modern-day marriage of convenience story,” she adds.

Tracy Andreen is another noteworthy author who wrote six films produced for Hallmark, including Snow Bride, Picture a Perfect Christmas, and It’s Christmas Eve. When asked what her secret sauce to success is, she replied with, “Being professional. When given a deadline, I do everything in my power to deliver on that deadline, especially as the time to start production nears.”

In addition to meeting deadlines, she says that it’s important to love what you do. “I love what I do and am beyond grateful for the opportunity to be able to do it, but at the end of the day it’s still work . . . awesome work I love, so I’m thrilled to do so and, hopefully, that shines through,” Andreen explains.

There’s also Jenny Hale whose novel Christmas Wishes & Mistletoe Kisses got picked by Hallmark. “It seems like romance is easy to write, but it’s a very careful dance between making it magical while also creating scenes and characters that feel real and relatable,” she says.

“People have told me for years that my books would be perfect for a Hallmark movie,” says bestselling romance author Pamela Gossiaux. “So this year I submitted my book The Scent of Love, a sweet, small town romance about the owner of a candle and gift shop, and the handsome man who rents the cottage on the shore. I love the type of books and movies that Hallmark produces. They’re the perfect escape!”

The Bottom Line: The Hallmark Channel produces 90+ holiday and romance films per year. With creativity, persistence, and passion, your novel may be one of them!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/  or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


Authors Want Hollywood to Call You? Use These Matchmakers & Turn Your Book Into a MOVIE!

Turn Your Book into a Hollywood Movie

Innovative Services Place Your Script in Front of Hollywood Producers

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

As a book publicist, I am asked on a regular basis, “Can you get my book turned into a movie?”  With all the streaming outlets like NETFLIX, AMAZON and others who desperately need new content, the demand for creative work has never been higher. Now there are services who can place your book or screenplay in front of Hollywood producers who can, in fact, turn it into a movie.  If you want to turn your book into a movie then check out these ‘matchmakers’ I’ve discovered below.

Greenlight My Movie

If you have a short film, book, screenplay, or true story, you can pitch it to Greenlight My Movie. Once you do, you’ll receive a guaranteed response from Hollywood buyers and representatives. To get started, create a profile, add your synopsis, find companies that may be interested, and submit your project. Warner Brothers states that Greenlight My Movie has a great process and has provided them with some great ideas. 

Pros of Greenlight My Movie

  • Optional Video: If you don’t have video, no worries. It’s optional so you can simply submit your synopsis and logline.
  • Guaranteed Response: A Hollywood buyer or rep will get back to you via a written email response. Their response will likely come with detailed feedback that will steer you in the right direction.

Cons of Greenlight My Movie

  • Submission Charge: You’ll have to pay $29.95 to submit your pitch. 
  • Will Have to Wait for a Response: While most people receive a response in about 3 to 4 weeks, you may have to wait longer to hear back. 

Hollywood Pitch Festival

Attend the 23rd annual Hollywood Pitch Festival and pitch A-list buyers and representatives. This year, the event will be held August 1st through 2nd in the Los Angeles area. It’s the only pitch festival that offers one-on-one pitch meetings in two days with over 200 of Hollywood’s top personnel under one roof. One-on-one pitch coaching via Skype is also available two weeks before the festival.

Pros of Hollywood Pitch Festival

  • No Limits: While you’re at the festival, you can pitch as many companies as you’d like because there are no limits.
  • Pitching Resources: Hollywood Pitch Festival wants you to succeed so they will send you pitching tips and how-to videos right before the event.

Cons of Hollywood Pitch Festival

  • Travel Involved: Since this is a physical event, you’ll have to travel to participate. This can be an issue if you’re limited on time and money. Fortunately, you can buy a virtual pass and submit your pitch online if you prefer.
  • Limited Attendance: The Hollywood Pitch Festival limits attendance to 200 people. So if you don’t sign up early enough, you may not make the cut. 

TaleFlick

Since its debut in 2018, TaleFlick has provided a searchable library of fiction, novels, and short stories. It strives to connect authors with film or TV producers. You can create your own page and match with vetted scriptwriters who can offer tips on how to improve your story. TaleFlick can also help you get discovered by producers looking for new material.

“TaleFlick is an effective, efficient way for your work to be presented directly to those people who may want to make a film out of it. I don’t know why it didn’t exist before but I’m glad it does now,” says Michael Bowker, author of Gods of Our Time.

Pros of TaleFlick

  • Great Exposure: With TaleFlick, you can submit your story online and get in front of the top studios, producers, and production companies.
  • Commitment to Giving Back: TaleFlick has a “1 Million Books 1 Million Children” initiative where they give one million books to one million children all around the world.

Cons of TaleFlick

  • Must Pay to Submit Stories: TaleFlick is not free for authors as you’ll have to pay $88 to submit your story.
  • Not All Stories Accepted: TaleFlick accepts scripts, screenplays, fiction and nonfiction books, manuscripts and children’s stories. The site doesn’t currently support short stories, comic books, and plays.

InkTip

InkTip began in 2000 to make it easy for producers, directors, agents, managers, and name actors to access quality screenplays and professional authors. Believe it or not, more than 375 feature films have been made from scripts and writers discovered through InkTip. One example of an InkTip success story is Fireball, which was produced by Harvey Kahn with Front Street Pictures and  aired on the Sci-Fi channel.

Pros of InkTip

  • Variety of Services: InkTip offers three main services to get your scripts noticed. These include its script listings and script renewals service, InkTip Magazine service, and Preferred Newsletter service.
  • Thousands of Industry Professionals: Over 2,700 producers, agents, managers and other industry professionals use InkTip.
  • Privacy of Scripts: You can’t look at the scripts of other writers as they are reserved for qualified industry professionals.

Cons of InkTip

  • Fees Involved: While you can register an account with InkTip for free, you have to pay for its specific services. Fees range from $30 to $60.

Spec Scout

Spec Scout’s goal is to be the best place to discover and promote the highest-quality screenplays, on and off the market. It hopes to give aspiring writers a way to break into the business. “Spec Scout is my secret weapon. Having the whole spec market in one place, with scores, loglines, and coverage is such a huge advantage. I can’t imagine not having access to this library,” says Stephanie Marin, producer at El Camino Entertainment.

Pros of Spec Scout

  • In-Depth Feedback: Once you submit your script, three readers will provide ratings and a comprehensive analysis of your script. You’ll get 8 to 10 pages of detailed comments that outline its strengths and weaknesses.
  • Script Score: Your “Script Score” will indicate the quality of your script. If you score 75 or above on the 100 point scale, you’ll be listed as a “Scouted” writer for free, forever.

Cons of Spec Scout

  • Pricey: To submit your script, you’ll have to pay $297. Rush service is available for an extra $100.
  • Feedback Takes Time: It’ll take about one month to receive feedback on your script. If you can’t wait that long, the $100 rush service can get it to you in one week.

The Bottom Line: Just like online dating doesn’t guarantee you’ll meet your special someone, there are no guarantees that these services will turn your work into a movie. Just look at them as another opportunity to gain exposure for your book.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net


Want to Sell Your Book to Hollywood? Create a LOGLINE

Sell Your Book to Hollywood

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications Book Marketing

If you want to sell your book to Hollywood it’ll help to think like Hollywood producers and directors. Since everybody is so busy these days you’ll have to boil down your book to a quick pitch that answers the question: What is your book about?

Your logline should SELL the story, not tell the story.

Think about it, do you have a one-sentence summation of your book to tell others? Do you have the main elements of the story composed together? If not, you need a logline.

A logline is a one or two sentence description that boils down the essential dramatic narrative in as succinct a manner as possible, says James Burbidge on Raindance.org

According to John Robert Marlow, author of Make Your Story a Movie: Adapting Your Book or Idea for Hollywood, “If you want to turn your book into a movie then understand that the people who represent and purchase books and screenplays are incredibly busy. They need a way to decide which stories are worth a closer look, and which are not—without actually taking the time to read those stories. This is where the logline comes into play.”

Hollywood Logline, Sell Your Book to Hollywood

Hollywood Logline, Sell Your Book to Hollywood

Here’s an example of a good logline for a book from the author resource website WildSound.ca

“The Last Thing She Did” is a romantic comedy in which a ditsy writer struggles to overcome her reliance on a dead friend’s advice in order to meet a deadline.

According to Michelle Mclean, Romance and Nonfiction author, the elements of your logline should consist of Characters, Conflict, Distinction, Setting, and Action.

“A logline is a brief description of the plot of your story, which involves an emotional hook and a twist of irony. A logline organizes a story in the briefest form possible while retaining the strongest emotional effect,” said Jen Grisanti, author of Story Line: Finding Gold in Your Life Story.

“A good use for the logline is the pitch. This handy, dandy quick summary of your story is very useful in persuading agents, editors, and even your dentist that you’ve hit on a ‘wow’ premise that simply MUST be written. Better yet, if it’s already written, then it MUST be read,” said David Macinnis Gill, author and teacher.

“The logline is just as important as a creative tool as it is as a vehicle to spark an interest of others,” said Noam Kroll of Indiewire, an award  winning Los Angeles based filmmaker, and founder of the boutique production company Creative Rebellion.

“You do not need to condense your entire book into one sentence but you do need to give enough information that the agent/editor/ curious acquaintance you are addressing gets the gist of your book, and is interested enough to want more,” said Michelle Mclean.

One author’s logline gained the interest of several producers and production companies as well as a major agent. “Sometimes the logline comes to me in the middle of writing a book and other times it’s the last thing I do. Whenever inspiration strikes, I capture the words immediately,” says Tricia Stewart Shiu author of the Moa Series, a Young Adult Science Fiction Fantasy.  “Writing a logline is, essentially, communicating with gut instincts the core essence of a story. When you’re done, it should ring like a bell,” adds Shiu.

“Another use for a logline is you. A novel is a big thing. It’s difficult to hold the whole story in your mind, especially when you’ve finished a first draft and are still giddy from the flow of creative juices. Writing a logline helps you define—for yourself—the essential elements of the plot. It will also let you know immediately if major components of the plot are missing. This prevents episodic plots that are a string of (interesting and exciting) events that lack a complete story spine,” added David Macinnis Gill.

While writing your logline make sure it is brief. According to Wildsound.ca, brevity is an absolute necessity of creating a good logline, as well as choosing your focus carefully. It is important to choose the focus of your logline because it is the selling point of your book. You need to draw the readers in with action, the plot twists and turns, anything that will grab their attention and interest for more.

Your logline can also be brought to life by an actor through Wildsound.ca who’ll post it to their YouTube Channel, which draws thousands of viewers daily. They claim that agents and producers check the site for new content. It’s worth a look. http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

The Bottom Line:  Creating a logline is an integral part of being able to convey to others what your book is about in a quick concise manner. Master this whether your book is going to Hollywood or not.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.book-marketing-expert.com/ or contact Lorenz at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net