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Book Publicist Scott Lorenz offers Authors Book Marketing Tips and Techniques on his Blog “The Book Publicist”

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How Authors Can Take a Great Head Shot

How Authors Can Take a Great Head Shot

I’ve worked with some of the best photographers in the USA. I’ve been in dozens of studios all over the country and have been privy to their backstage techniques. These photographers have photographed Miss America contestants, professional hockey and baseball players as well as CEOs, authors, doctors, lawyers and entrepreneurs. I got the skinny directly from them on their tips for getting the best head shot possible.

While the written word is powerful in landing a media placement, as a book publicist I know that a great photo can clinch a media opportunity just as well and sometimes even faster. How? It’s simple. The photo immediately tells the reporter if the author looks credible and it tells a TV producer if the person is going to look good on a TV interview. If you don’t think they care, think again. It also declares race, sex and sometimes creed. It all matters, and don’t assume it’s a negative thing as it helps news producers provide a balanced newscast so that all voices can be heard. It’s the same with print or broadcast media.

To be sure you convey your message in your headshot and to put your best face forward you’ll want to hear some tips on How to take a great headshot.

First let’s talk about the use of the head shot and its purpose as that dictates the style.

Author Headshots will be used on a book cover and press materials, website and social media. You want multiple variations as the thumbnail close up on Amazon will be different from the one you use on LinkedIn, Amazon and your book flap. Is this a serious book? If so then you should look professional. If it’s a cookbook then look like a cook in proper attire in the kitchen. If you are a doctor, then look like one!

Renowned photographer Sam T’ang of Sam T’ang Production Studios, who regularly photographs Miss America and Miss USA contestants, says planning ahead is critical and offers these tips:

  1. Get a good night’s sleep and rest the day before your shoot. (You don’t want wrinkles or baggie eyes for your shoot).
  2. A good headshot should focus just on your face. Clothing should be complementary & should have contrast, IE, someone with lighter color hair should have darker tops or suits, someone with darker hair should have lighter colored tops or suits.
  3. Clothing/wardrobe should not be busy or have patterns. Always bring several different outfits if possible. It is always better to have too much than only one outfit to work with.
  4. Backgrounds should be clean, un-cluttered and should not have a pattern (unless it’s an environmental portrait).
  5. Accessories (Women). Jewelry should be subtle and not overpowering (again, the main focus is on the face).
  6. MAKEUP/HAIR (Women & Men). If it is possible to have a makeup artist/hair stylist, hire one! Makeup is not only important, but makeup looks COMPLETELY different on camera than in real life and the camera PICKS UP EVERYTHING. Everyday makeup under professional photography lighting and strobes will look like you have no makeup at all. A professional makeup artist is well worth the investment!
  7. A professional photographer should understand lighting conditions whether it’s natural light or strobes (flash). Good lighting makes a huge difference in your photos. Be aware that shooting under fluorescent lights will cast a green tint to your photos.
  8. There are many talented photographers out there, but only a few who actually specialize and can take a GREAT HEADSHOT. A good photographer should make you feel comfortable and be able to communicate and direct you, thus making your shots look natural and relaxed instead of stiff or too posed and awkward.
  9. Almost all images are retouched and edited. One caveat just doesn’t have your photographer OVER RETOUCH your photo or use FILTERS that make you look too plastic and not real (unless that is the look you want).

Jack Kenny whose photography book CUBA is filled with photos of the people of Cuba says he likes shooting outdoors in available light. Natural light outside can be beautiful. I like to shoot in doorways or windows or under overpasses, keeping the subject just out of the direct light.

For headshots, says Kenny, “I like to work both in the studio and in natural light. Sometimes I use a combination of the two where the natural light isn’t sufficient to “fill” the subject. For males I prefer to use a single light source (in varying sizes depending on the drama desired). The light is placed at a 30 to 90-degree angle from the subject and sometimes I use an edge light on the opposite side or a reflector to fill in the shadows. For women I tend to use a softer light – usually two front lights – one weaker than the other, and I keep the light sources closer to the camera.”

According to Steve Kovich who shot for the Detroit Red Wings, Tigers, Lions and is currently the Tampa Bay Rays official team photographer, “You want to create depth and mood.  Lighting a subject from high above and off to the side is what I like to do. This lighting style is commonly referred to as “Rembrandt” lighting as this is the way the light came into his studio.”

“On the creative end, it’s the ability to evoke or more likely to capture emotion. Whether it be happy, sad, or otherwise,” says Kovich.

In the end, says Jack Kenny, almost any light can be used depending on the effects desired, but a true headshot should emphasize the subject and not the photographer.

About Sam T’ang

Based in Detroit and Miami, Sam T’ang is a national and international published photographer specializing in Beauty, Glamour, Fashion and Swimwear. Sam’s work has appeared in advertisements, calendars, magazines and posters: MAXIM, STUFF, PLAYBOY, FHM, COSMOPOLITAN, GLAMOUR, TEEN, YOUNG MISS, PERFECT 10, OCEAN DRIVE, HAWAIIAN TROPIC, VENUS SWIMWEAR, FITNESS USA, AUTORAMA, and many others.

Sam has photographed headshots for the Miss America, Miss Universe, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, Miss Venus Swimwear, Miss Hawaiian Tropic pageant contestants, the Detroit Pistons and Detroit Red Wings players headshots/promos as well as thousands of models, actors and celebrities. (www.SamTang.com) 248-845-8274 and 305-502-1354.

About Jack Kenny

Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Kenny specializes in headshots and has photographed dozens of CEOs, doctors, lawyers, authors, and entrepreneurs. Kenny is also author/publisher of Cuba where he takes readers on a photographic journey through modern day Cuba. www.kennyphoto.com (734) 395-1265

About Steven Kovich

Based in St. Petersburg, Florida, Steven Kovich has photographed celebrities such as Kevin Costner, Kevin Bacon and Hulk Hogan as well as hundreds of sports figures including Derek Jeter and Red Wing hockey great Steve Yzerman. He’s also the Tampa Bay Rays official team photographer. His list of corporate clients includes Hyatt, Ameritech, AT&T, CBS, Coke, Chrysler, Domino’s Pizza, Detroit Symphony, ESPN, Ford, Dupont, General Motors, Getty Images, Proctor & Gamble, Pulte Homes, American Red Cross and the US Postal Service. Kovich’s web site has few words as he lets his photos speak for themselves. www.kovich.com 727-452-2349.

The Bottom Line: Your headshot is one of the most important elements in your book promotion. Get a professional to shoot it. Don’t skimp out and use a cropped shot from your summer vacation!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Book Marketing at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.


Authors Tap into the Power of a Goodreads Giveaway

Authors Tap into the Power of a Goodreads Giveaway

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

As a book publicist, I am always on the lookout for effective yet inexpensive ways to reach book buyers. Goodreads is one option. Owned by Amazon, With Goodreads, you can put your book into as many hands as possible, initiate word of mouth promotion and hopefully, succeed with flying colors. If you’re a published author, rest assured you already have a profile on Goodreads. Here’s how you can take full advantage of the platform:

1. Run a Goodreads Giveaway

Through a Goodreads Giveaway, you can promote yourself and your book to the ideal audience. A Goodreads Giveaway is exactly what it sounds like: You give away copies of your books to interested readers. To set up a Goodreads Giveaway, follow these steps.

  • Set Up Your Author Profile: First, create a Goodreads account, find the book(s) you’ve written, click on your name from the book’s page, and “claim” your author profile. After you receive an email confirmation, you can customize your profile.
  • Choose Your Book Format: Scroll down to “Your Giveaways” on your author dashboard and click on “Listing a Giveaway.” From there, decide whether you want to give away print or Kindle versions of your book.
  • Choose a Package: Next, select the Standard Package ($119) or Premium Package ($599). “Do the $119 eBook Goodreads giveaway,” says Alessandra Torre, a New York Times Bestselling Author and co-founder of Inkers Con dedicated to helping authors.
  • Choose Your Timeframe: Your giveaway can last anywhere between 1 week and 30 days. I recommend three weeks because it’s long enough for people to notice your giveaway, but not so long that they’ll forget about it.
  • Choose the Number of Books: I recommend giving away 100 Kindle books.
  • Spread the Word: While Goodreads readers will hopefully find your giveaway organically, it can’t hurt to promote it on your social media outlets and ask your network to share.

You can see a list of Goodreads Giveaways here.  If you’d like to hear a pro/con on a Goodreads Giveaway, then check out what YA Fantasy author Bethany Atazadeh has to say.

2. Participate in an Online Q&A Session

Ask the Author is Goodread’s Q&A platform on Goodreads that allows readers to submit questions to Goodreads Authors whenever they’d like. Until you decide to answer a question, it won’t be visible to the public. This gives you complete control over when you respond to reader questions and how you respond to them.

3. Blog, Blog, and Blog

Goodreads gives you the opportunity to blog about anything and everything.  If you have a blog, you can set it up, so Goodreads picks it up automatically via a RSS feed. You can write about your writing career, share reviews of your books, and position yourself as an expert. The sky’s the limit so get creative and think about what your reader base would like!

4. Publicize Upcoming Events

As an author you know how important it is to get out and about. If you have upcoming book signings and speaking engagements, you owe it to yourself to advertise them through Goodreads events.

5. Share Excerpts of Upcoming Publications

Excerpts can get your audience excited about a book you have in the works. Don’t be afraid to share them on Goodreads via your author blog.

6. Post Videos

Readers are more likely to remember your messages when you deliver them by video. If you can, create and publish unique videos on Goodreads about your books, charitable contributions, upcoming events, and more.

7. Create a Listopia List

Listopia is a way for people to find new books to read. Since most readers stick to a genre when they finish one book, they go to another in the same genre. I.E. Romance readers are not buying a business book after they finish their last romance book, they usually buy inside the same genre. Listopia allows readers to discover books that are similar to the ones they like or in the same genre because their book is listed as being similar. The concept is “If you like this book you’ll probably like that book.”

8. Share, Share, and Share

Last but not least, share your list of favorite books and recent reads with your fans! This tip is simple but very effective and important.

The Bottom Line: If you’re in search of a fresh yet effective way to promote your work as an author, you owe it to yourself to explore Goodreads.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Book Marketing, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Book Marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.


Attention Women Authors – Don’t Sell Yourselves Short

Attention Women Authors – Don’t Sell Yourselves Short

By: Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

It’s happened again. A female author client of mine decided that she did not want to conduct interviews with podcasters, radio or TV show hosts. Why? Because she thought her southern accent was too strong.

I disagreed emphatically… to no avail. I thought her accent was fine. She was easy to understand, and it added authenticity to the interview. I even offered more media training to help give her confidence. “Sorry, not going to do it.”

Now, had she or any other client had a strong accent making an interview impossible to understand, then we would most definitely focus on other methods to promote the book. We are not here to make a fool of anyone.

But having self-critical author is not new.

In another instance, a prospective female author, called me to discuss promoting her book. But she warned me that she was shy about getting publicity, and that she was not sure about using the incredible endorsement she got from a bestselling author of 30 million books – Jack Canfield. I was stunned.

I honestly have never come across a male author who said, “I am not worthy of the PR you are about to get me!” They may be out there, but I’ve never seen them.

I have, however, spoken to a number of women who have implied that, for a variety of reasons, they are not worthy of the attention, and I am here to tell you to STOP IT!

I explained to my prospective client that before I can even begin to help her, she needs to stop pulling punches, and to stop selling herself short, and recognize her self-worth.

Often, the biggest barrier between some women and success is themselves. This concept is discussed in the multi-year-best-selling book Lean In, written by Sheryl Sandberg, the former Chief Operating Officer of Facebook. Sandberg says that women are conditioned by society to blend in, to stay out of the limelight, and even to downplay their power or success. In the book, she cites a meeting with Tim Geithner, who was at the time the Secretary of the Treasury:

“Secretary Geithner’s team, all women, took their food last and sat in chairs off to the side of the room. … [They] had every right to be at this meeting, but because of their seating choice, they seemed like spectators rather than participants.”

It is no secret that some women have been taught to hold themselves back for cultural, religious and other reasons. This is archaic and has no place in our world today nor should it.

The Bottom Line: Women, put your foot on the accelerator and don’t let it off! Believe in your book, enter book award contests, listen to your PR professional, do the interviews, and believe that you are worthy of winning! Damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Book Marketing, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Book Marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.


Authors: Contribute to Print Pubs to Promote Your Book

Book Publicist Scott Lorenz Offers Tips on How to Contribute to the New York Times, Huffington Post and Success!

Authors: Contribute to Print Pubs to Promote Your Book

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Whether you’re a new author or have been around for decades, it’s important to continually promote yourself. The more you build your brand, the more likely you are to get published, sell your works, and meet your goals.

By writing for prominent online publications, you can do just that. Do your research and find several publications that accept entries from authors. Then, follow their editorial guidelines and submit original, compelling articles.

Editorial Guidelines

Each publication has their own unique editorial guidelines so it’s important to write a piece to their target audience. If they say they want a 500-word piece don’t turn in 900-word piece. Simple right?

For example, The Huffington Post says they are “Looking for freelancers who have compelling and unique pitches about TV, film, music, celebrity and internet culture, with an eye toward how pop culture and entertainment trends reflect the world around us.”

A prominent business publication says “We inspire and educate small business owners to start and grow successful businesses.  We also work with large brands that want to reach small businesses.”

Then each publication has their preferred article structure, which often includes information about word count, titles, headings and subheadings, paragraphs, and sentences. The article must conform to their linking policy. (Some allow links to websites, and some do not)

Here’s an example, “Your article length should be from 500 – 1,000 words – give or take. We want to avoid the death wall of text, especially as our posts are seen on mobile devices. Keep paragraphs between 3-5 sentences max.” “Sentences should be no longer than 19 words. Break up long sentences into shorter sentences where you see “but, that and because.”

Add a minimum of two links. Aim to place one around the 50% mark. Have at least one quality internal link that relates to the blog content as well as 1-2 external, authoritative links.”

Most editorial guidelines will also discuss what types of media (images, videos, infographics, etc.) are permitted. In addition, they’ll also mention any SEO preferences and byline submission requirements. Typically, you’ll be able to include your headshot, social media platforms, and a link to your website. This part is almost as important as the actual article so put some thought into it!

Publications Seeking Contributors

There is no shortage of online publications that accept submissions from authors like you. Here are a few options to get you started.

The Bottom Line: Make the effort to contribute to publications. One big hit could propel you and your book to great heights!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Book Marketing, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Book Marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.


Authors – Want to Create a Pen Name? Here’s How to Do It

Authors - Want to Create a Pen Name? Here's How to Do It

Having a difficult time selecting a pen name? Try these random name generators. You may get some inspiration from some of these and its fun to see what they come up with.

By: Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

Do you need a pen name? A rich tradition has existed for hundreds of years for fiction writers to use pen names. You may be surprised to learn that some authors have more than 10 pen names. Here’s why pen names have been and continue to be widely used: Many authors believe that their name can affect how their audience sees them and even affect their book sales.

One of the most famous pen names, of course, was Samuel Clemens who wrote under the name Mark Twain. Another well-known one is Lewis Carroll, which was used by Alice in Wonderland’s author, Charles Dodgdon. He gained a considerable reputation as a mathematician and didn’t want to create confusion by writing fiction under his real name.

In 1992, Putnam Publishers asked Nora Roberts to come up with a second pen name because they could not keep up with the prolific writer’s romance novels let alone the genre of romance suspense novels she wanted to write. So she took the initials J.D. from sons Jason and Dan and shortened Roberts to Robb. She has also written under the pen names Jill March and Sarah Hardesty.

New York Times Best Selling author Nora Roberts is a pen name used by Eleanor Marie Robertson. Nora Roberts’ name has regularly appeared on the New York Times Best Seller List since 1999. Since her first best seller in 1991, Nora’s books have spent 1,045 weeks on the Best Seller List. Believe it or not, that’s equivalent to 20 consecutive years of weekly bestsellers.

In 1992, Putnam Publishers asked Nora Roberts to come up with a second pen name because they could not keep up with the prolific writer’s romance novels let alone the new genre of romance suspense novels she wanted to write. So, she took the initials J.D. from sons Jason and Dan and shortened Roberts to Robb. She also has written under the pen names Jill March and Sara Hardesty.

Whether you call it a pen name, pseudonym, non de plume, alias or AKA, you are creating a new persona that’ll need care and feeding!  Scott Lorenz, Book Publicist

One of my book marketing clients served as a Navy Seal in the Iraq War and then returned to write a book about his war experiences.  To protect his personal safety and maintain security for his family, he used the pen name Chuck Bravedy.  The author was concerned that extremists living in America would be offended and angered by his controversial book and come after him or his family.

The fact that Chuck Bravedy was not listed as a Navy Seal caused The Pentagon to call me. They explained they wanted to keep phonies from impersonating military officials. I gladly connected them both!

Another client was a former CIA station chief. He was concerned about the impact a pen name would have on promoting his book. After discussing the pros and cons he decided to use his real name. (The CIA has to clear any books written by former high-level staff to make sure they do not reveal secrets).

I’ve represented two Medical Doctors who both wrote serious erotica. Neither wanted their hospitals to know about their ‘other’ life so they both chose pen names and donned disguises for their headshots.

From a marketing standpoint if your real-life identity is associated with a business and you want the book to promote your business, or vice versa, then no need for a pen name. But if you have success, and don’t want that success threatened by pursuing an avocation of writing, then a pen name would be in order. Pen names may create marketing challenges, most of which can be overcome, and so the marketing implications need to be examined before publishing.

Since the publishers of JK Rowling, the author of Harry Potter, were unsure if the preteen boys that she was targeting would accept wizard stories that were written by a woman, they encouraged her to use her initials instead of her real name, which is Joanne Rowling. The “K’ in JK came from her grandmother’s name Kathleen and she’s been known as JK Rowling ever since.

Known as one of the most famous comic book writers in the world, Stan Lee’s real name is Stanley Martin Lieber. He initially decided to publish under Stan Lee because he thought he would eventually transition to more serious work and wanted to use his real name when and if that time came. Once he realized that he was destined to stay a comic book writer, he legally changed his name to Stan Lee.

If you’ve ever read the popular children’s series, A Series of Unfortunate Events and All the Wrong Questions, you probably know that the author is Lemony Snicket. Believe it or not, his real name is Daniel Handler. He decided to go with Lemony Snicket because he wanted to anonymously contact right-wing organizations. Handler first came up with the Lemony Snicket pen name while doing research for his first novel, The Basic Eight. He needed to contact right-wing organizations for the book, but he didn’t want to give them his real name. So, he called himself “Lemony Snicket,” and the moniker stuck.

Reasons for using a pen name include:

  • To avoid embarrassment
  • For personal safety or security
  • If you write under more than one genre
  • If your name is hard to pronounce or spell
  • If your name is not marketable
  • If your name conflicts with the name of another author
  • To hide gender (a male writing in the predominantly female genre)
  • To avoid confusing readers if you are well known in another field.

Reasons to use your real name:

If you want to hide from the public and from people you work with or worked with, etc., then a pen name is fine. But, if it’s not important, why bother? So, my vote is to use your own name. Here are just a few points to ponder.

  • If you are not trying to hide from anyone.
  • To brand yourself and promote your name for speaking gigs or consulting assignments.
  • If you are planning to write a series of books.
  • So people can find your published works.
  • Your face behind your name builds trust and confidence with readers.

Here’s some interesting information I’ve obtained from librarians and employees at bookstores. Is there a popular author whose work is similar to yours?  Why not select a pen name beginning with the same letter as that author’s name? Since most books are filed by genre and then the author’s last name, selecting a pen name with the same letter puts you in close proximity to their books.

Someone searching for that author could ‘stumble’ upon your book and decide to take a look. Radio stations have done it for years by selecting their location on the ‘dial’ nearby other highly rated stations so they could benefit from the proximity of that popular station. Crafty? Perhaps but do you want to sell books or not?

Having a difficult time selecting a pen name? Try these random name generators. You may get some inspiration from some of these and it’s fun to see what they come up with.

1. https://chucklehound.com/generator/

2. https://businessnameguide.com/

3. https://www.dotomator.com/

4. https://naming.net/

5. https://www.shopify.com/tools/business-name-generator

6. https://namestation.com/

7. https://www.businessnamegenerator.net/

8. https://businessnamegenerator.com/

9. https://www.netsubstance.com/

10. https://looka.com/business-name-generator/

11. https://namelix.com/

12. https://www.wix.com/tools/business-name-generator

13. https://logo.com/business-name-generator

14. https://www.oberlo.com/tools/business-name-generator

15. https://blog.reedsy.com/pen-name-generator/

16. https://www.name-generator.org.uk/pen-name/

17. https://www.dcode.fr/pseudonym-generator

18. https://www.invaluable.com/blog/pen-name-generator/

19. https://www.namegenerator.biz/pseudonym-generator.php

20. https://bookbird.io/tools/pen-name-generator/

21. https://www.fakenamegenerator.com/

22. https://www.fantasynamegenerators.com/victorian-names.php

23. https://www.namegeneratorfun.com/cool

24. https://www.seventhsanctum.com/generate.php?Genname=evilnamer

25. https://rumandmonkey.com/widgets/toys/namegen/12465#.XG11qegzbIU

26. https://www.namegenerator.co/fantasy/pen-name-generator

27. https://www.namesnerd.com/people/pen-name-generator/

28. https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1172-the-ultimate-romance-pen-name-generator

29. https://domainwheel.com/pen-name-generator/

30. https://bookraid.com/ai/pen-name-generator

31. https://www.duplichecker.com/name-generator.php

32. https://anytexteditor.com/pen-name-generator

33. https://www.behindthename.com/

34. https://www.fantasynamegen.com/

35. https://www.orrt.org/literary/names.php

36. https://thestoryshack.com/tools/pen-name-generator/

37. https://coda.io/@hales/fake-name-generator

38. https://www.selfpublishingtitans.com/tools/Pen-Name-Generator

39. https://www.brandroot.com/business-name-generator

40. https://randomnamegenerators.com/various-name-generators/pen-name-generator/

41. https://www.renderforest.com/business-name-generator

The Bottom Line: A Pen Name is an author’s useful tool for the right reasons.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else?

Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!