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Book Publicist Scott Lorenz offers Authors Book Marketing Tips and Techniques on his Blog “The Book Publicist”

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Ghostwriters, Who Needs Them? YOU DO! Read This Before You Hire One

Ghostwriters, Who Needs Them? YOU DO! Read This Before You Hire One

By: Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

Ghostwriters work behind the curtain as narrative architects of the literary world. You’ve probably read a ghostwritten book without knowing it, since their names are rarely credited in the books they write. Some experts estimate that up to 60% of the nonfiction section in your nearest bookstore is ghostwritten.

As a book publicist deeply involved in the world of storytelling, some of my clients seek out ghostwriters to pen their books. Working with a ghostwriter can save you valuable time and energy and give your book a professional edge. But ghostwriters can be hard to vet, and their referrals tend to be word-of-mouth. There are also a few things you should know before you hire one. So, I put together a quick list of my favorite ghostwriters in 2023, as well as the top agencies, and a few tips for hiring a ghostwriter.

Marie Hasty

“The books I write for my clients change lives. That’s what I love about ghostwriting — even more so than personal relationships and getting to learn from healthcare leaders. These aren’t vanity books; they’re deeply impactful career investments.” 

Marie is a concierge ghostwriter and former hospital nurse who writes business books and memoirs for healthcare innovators. Her clients are often busy clinicians and leaders who are focusing on a better future for medicine. Her writing helps build brand authority and audience recognition. She loves elevating these leaders’ influence with the books she writes, as well as seeing her clients succeed as published authors.

To learn more about Marie’s work, visit her website: www.mariehasty.com

Debra Englander

“You need to think about your target audience. Some authors want a book to promote their business or gain more visibility. But you should consider the benefits to the reader. Ultimately, writing a book that provides something tangible — skills, exercises, stories – is the one that will be recommended. As ghostwriter and editor, I help the author communicate his or her message in the most effective way to reach a wide readership. Having worked as an editor at traditional publishers, I have a good handle on what books are likely to succeed.”

Debra Englander has worked as a writer and editor for magazines and publishers; she managed a business book program at Wiley for seventeen years, publishing numerous NY Times and Wall Street Journal Bestsellers.

Learn more about her work at www.linkedin.com/in/DebraEnglander or contact her at: [email protected]

Mike Ball

“We can work with your outline, your rough manuscript, or we can interview you and write your book from scratch.”

Mike Ball is an Erma Bombeck Award-winning author with three books of his own in print, including an Amazon bestseller, “Banjos, Boats and Butt Dialing.” He is a popular speaker at writer’s conferences and retreats and facilitates a number of writers’ groups.

Mike has helped hundreds of authors bring their work into the world, partnering with them in various roles as an editor, writing coach and ghost writer. He most recently penned “MIA’S ODYSSEY.” This 12-time-award-winning book has captivated the hearts and minds of many across the USA for its powerful story about a woman married off by her parents, abused by her husband, homeless all while raising five children. This book is currently in development as a screenplay. He’s ghostwritten several memoirs and a book about “SALES.” CNN has named him a CNN Hero for 2023 for his work with troubled youth using music as an expression of their innermost fears, hopes and dreams. If you have a compassionate, endearing story then Mike is your ghost.

Check out his website: https://www.mikeballonline.com/

Erick Mertz

“Whether I’m working on a memoir or screenplay, my work is focused on bringing the best possible story to the page. I believe we are all natural storytellers. Working with a professional ghostwriter offers the best opportunity to affect your target audience.”

Erick Mertz is a dynamic storyteller who left a career in social work to follow his calling as a full-time professional ghostwriter. He is a native of the Pacific Northwest with dozens of ghostwritten screenplays, television episodes, business books, memoirs and novels to his credit. He especially enjoys working with his clients to discover what it is that makes their story unique.

Visit his website at: www.erickmertzwriting.com

Erick is also the author of How To Hire A Ghostwriter: Your Guide To Finding The Best Pro For Your Writing Project.”

Christina Schweighofer

“From my earliest days as a journalist, I have loved interviewing people, hearing about their experiences and dreams, and making their story come alive on the page. My clients, in turn, feel seen and valued for who they are.”

Christina has a passion for writing that began in her days as a staff journalist and reporter in Austria. She’s an accomplished writer and interviewer, known for her ability to capture the essence of the people she writes for. Christina specializes in personal and business memoirs and has interviewed and portrayed notable names such as John Irving, Lisbeth Zwerger, Wolfgang Puck, and more.

Learn more about Christina and her ghostwriting services at: www.chswriter.com

Pam Gossiaux

My clients are often busy entrepreneurs and CEOs who have a great book idea, but no time to write about it. Entrepreneurs are fearless about change, they love challenges, and are known for creating the future they want. I love being a part of that energy! Handing them a finished book that they can add to their platform is very rewarding for both of us. I love to write and am blessed that I can do what I love for a living!”

Pamela specializes in ghostwriting business books and articles but writes sweet romance fiction on the side. Her clients are USA TODAY and Wall Street Journal bestselling authors and range from budding entrepreneurs to seasoned C-Suite executives.

Explore Pamela’s website at: www.BestsellingBookShepherd.com

Dr. Don Steele

“My Legacy books capture the life of people with stories that need to be told. There’s an African Proverb that says “When a man dies a whole library of life experience turns to ashes”. The Legacy books I write prevent that.”

Dr. Steele has an impressive background in education and as a corporate speaker at the highest levels and has published nine books, three of which have been used as university textbooks. His ‘Moments to Remember’ Legacy book series helps preserve and elevate stories of people who have led fascinating lives. His titles have included Rebel Without Applause, Undefeated, and The Misfit Millionaire: The Life and Times of Terry Duperon.

Find out more about Don on his website: www.performancelearninginc.com/authoring-1

Ghostwriting Agencies

Writer’s groups and agencies can be another great resource for finding a ghostwriter for your next project.

Jenkins Group

With 35 years of custom book publishing and ghostwriting experience, the Jenkins Group has written and produced books for thousands of clients. With the expertise of their professional writers, your ideas and concepts are transformed into polished and engaging content. Working closely with their clients, Jenkins Group understands your goals, voice, and objectives, ensuring that the final product aligns with your vision. Since they are full service, they can also handle the publishing and distribution of your book once its completed. Reach them at: www.JenkinsGroupInc.com

Gotham Ghostwriters

Gotham Ghostwriters, founded by CEO Dan Gerstein, is the first agency dedicated to long-form writing solutions. With a network of over 3,200 skilled writers, Gotham has successfully matched clients with top-tier editorial professionals for over a decade. From business books to white papers, their one-stop solution offers excellent ghostwriting support and expertise.

Between these top agencies and the writers, I mentioned earlier, you should be able to find someone who meets your ghostwriting needs. But what should you know before hiring a book ghostwriter? Let’s talk about it.

4 Tips for Hiring a Ghostwriter

Know ghostwriting rates.

Many people are surprised at the going rate for ghostwriting. For example, Gotham’s rates start around $30-35k. Many of the top writers’ charge in the six figures. J.D. Moehringer, who ghostwrote Prince Harry’s memoir Spare, was paid a million dollars. If you want a professionally written book, expect to pay at least $25,000.

Know your audience.

It’s essential to know and understand who you want to target before you hire a ghostwriter for your book. Knowing your audience leads to a more successful book launch and a more targeted book. Your ghostwriter won’t intuit your audience, so it’s essential to know this before you work together.

Do some vetting.

Ghostwriters can be difficult to evaluate because many work under strict Non-Disclosure Agreements. But any writer should have samples of work you can view before agreeing to work together. You’ll likely be able to tell after a quick conversation whether they’re experienced or not.

Seek compatibility.

The writing process can be an intimate affair with the author and ghostwriter. Look for someone who is reliable, and who you genuinely like talking to. They should be good listeners and take the time to understand you and your project.

Following these tips will help you find a ghostwriter who will elevate your story, build your brand authority, and above all, make the book-writing process a breeze. If you’ve been thinking about writing a book for more than a year… it’s time to hire a ghostwriter. We’re not getting any younger!

The Bottom Line: Hire a Ghostwriter! A ghostwriter will get the job done faster and probably better than you can write it yourself.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else?

Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!


Authors – Want to Create a Pen Name? Here’s How to Do It

Authors - Want to Create a Pen Name? Here's How to Do It

Having a difficult time selecting a pen name? Try these random name generators. You may get some inspiration from some of these and its fun to see what they come up with.

By: Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

Do you need a pen name? A rich tradition has existed for hundreds of years for fiction writers to use pen names. You may be surprised to learn that some authors have more than 10 pen names. Here’s why pen names have been and continue to be widely used: Many authors believe that their name can affect how their audience sees them and even affect their book sales.

One of the most famous pen names, of course, was Samuel Clemens who wrote under the name Mark Twain. Another well-known one is Lewis Carroll, which was used by Alice in Wonderland’s author, Charles Dodgdon. He gained a considerable reputation as a mathematician and didn’t want to create confusion by writing fiction under his real name.

In 1992, Putnam Publishers asked Nora Roberts to come up with a second pen name because they could not keep up with the prolific writer’s romance novels let alone the genre of romance suspense novels she wanted to write. So she took the initials J.D. from sons Jason and Dan and shortened Roberts to Robb. She has also written under the pen names Jill March and Sarah Hardesty.

New York Times Best Selling author Nora Roberts is a pen name used by Eleanor Marie Robertson. Nora Roberts’ name has regularly appeared on the New York Times Best Seller List since 1999. Since her first best seller in 1991, Nora’s books have spent 1,045 weeks on the Best Seller List. Believe it or not, that’s equivalent to 20 consecutive years of weekly bestsellers.

In 1992, Putnam Publishers asked Nora Roberts to come up with a second pen name because they could not keep up with the prolific writer’s romance novels let alone the new genre of romance suspense novels she wanted to write. So, she took the initials J.D. from sons Jason and Dan and shortened Roberts to Robb. She also has written under the pen names Jill March and Sara Hardesty.

Whether you call it a pen name, pseudonym, non de plume, alias or AKA, you are creating a new persona that’ll need care and feeding!  Scott Lorenz, Book Publicist

One of my book marketing clients served as a Navy Seal in the Iraq War and then returned to write a book about his war experiences.  To protect his personal safety and maintain security for his family, he used the pen name Chuck Bravedy.  The author was concerned that extremists living in America would be offended and angered by his controversial book and come after him or his family.

The fact that Chuck Bravedy was not listed as a Navy Seal caused The Pentagon to call me. They explained they wanted to keep phonies from impersonating military officials. I gladly connected them both!

Another client was a former CIA station chief. He was concerned about the impact a pen name would have on promoting his book. After discussing the pros and cons he decided to use his real name. (The CIA has to clear any books written by former high-level staff to make sure they do not reveal secrets).

I’ve represented two Medical Doctors who both wrote serious erotica. Neither wanted their hospitals to know about their ‘other’ life so they both chose pen names and donned disguises for their headshots.

From a marketing standpoint if your real-life identity is associated with a business and you want the book to promote your business, or vice versa, then no need for a pen name. But if you have success, and don’t want that success threatened by pursuing an avocation of writing, then a pen name would be in order. Pen names may create marketing challenges, most of which can be overcome, and so the marketing implications need to be examined before publishing.

Since the publishers of JK Rowling, the author of Harry Potter, were unsure if the preteen boys that she was targeting would accept wizard stories that were written by a woman, they encouraged her to use her initials instead of her real name, which is Joanne Rowling. The “K’ in JK came from her grandmother’s name Kathleen and she’s been known as JK Rowling ever since.

Known as one of the most famous comic book writers in the world, Stan Lee’s real name is Stanley Martin Lieber. He initially decided to publish under Stan Lee because he thought he would eventually transition to more serious work and wanted to use his real name when and if that time came. Once he realized that he was destined to stay a comic book writer, he legally changed his name to Stan Lee.

If you’ve ever read the popular children’s series, A Series of Unfortunate Events and All the Wrong Questions, you probably know that the author is Lemony Snicket. Believe it or not, his real name is Daniel Handler. He decided to go with Lemony Snicket because he wanted to anonymously contact right-wing organizations. Handler first came up with the Lemony Snicket pen name while doing research for his first novel, The Basic Eight. He needed to contact right-wing organizations for the book, but he didn’t want to give them his real name. So, he called himself “Lemony Snicket,” and the moniker stuck.

Reasons for using a pen name include:

  • To avoid embarrassment
  • For personal safety or security
  • If you write under more than one genre
  • If your name is hard to pronounce or spell
  • If your name is not marketable
  • If your name conflicts with the name of another author
  • To hide gender (a male writing in the predominantly female genre)
  • To avoid confusing readers if you are well known in another field.

Reasons to use your real name:

If you want to hide from the public and from people you work with or worked with, etc., then a pen name is fine. But, if it’s not important, why bother? So, my vote is to use your own name. Here are just a few points to ponder.

  • If you are not trying to hide from anyone.
  • To brand yourself and promote your name for speaking gigs or consulting assignments.
  • If you are planning to write a series of books.
  • So people can find your published works.
  • Your face behind your name builds trust and confidence with readers.

Here’s some interesting information I’ve obtained from librarians and employees at bookstores. Is there a popular author whose work is similar to yours?  Why not select a pen name beginning with the same letter as that author’s name? Since most books are filed by genre and then the author’s last name, selecting a pen name with the same letter puts you in close proximity to their books.

Someone searching for that author could ‘stumble’ upon your book and decide to take a look. Radio stations have done it for years by selecting their location on the ‘dial’ nearby other highly rated stations so they could benefit from the proximity of that popular station. Crafty? Perhaps but do you want to sell books or not?

Having a difficult time selecting a pen name? Try these random name generators. You may get some inspiration from some of these and it’s fun to see what they come up with.

1. https://chucklehound.com/generator/

2. https://businessnameguide.com/

3. https://www.dotomator.com/

4. https://naming.net/

5. https://www.shopify.com/tools/business-name-generator

6. https://namestation.com/

7. https://www.businessnamegenerator.net/

8. https://businessnamegenerator.com/

9. https://www.netsubstance.com/

10. https://looka.com/business-name-generator/

11. https://namelix.com/

12. https://www.wix.com/tools/business-name-generator

13. https://logo.com/business-name-generator

14. https://www.oberlo.com/tools/business-name-generator

15. https://blog.reedsy.com/pen-name-generator/

16. https://www.name-generator.org.uk/pen-name/

17. https://www.dcode.fr/pseudonym-generator

18. https://www.invaluable.com/blog/pen-name-generator/

19. https://www.namegenerator.biz/pseudonym-generator.php

20. https://bookbird.io/tools/pen-name-generator/

21. https://www.fakenamegenerator.com/

22. https://www.fantasynamegenerators.com/victorian-names.php

23. https://www.namegeneratorfun.com/cool

24. https://www.seventhsanctum.com/generate.php?Genname=evilnamer

25. https://rumandmonkey.com/widgets/toys/namegen/12465#.XG11qegzbIU

26. https://www.namegenerator.co/fantasy/pen-name-generator

27. https://www.namesnerd.com/people/pen-name-generator/

28. https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1172-the-ultimate-romance-pen-name-generator

29. https://domainwheel.com/pen-name-generator/

30. https://bookraid.com/ai/pen-name-generator

31. https://www.duplichecker.com/name-generator.php

32. https://anytexteditor.com/pen-name-generator

33. https://www.behindthename.com/

34. https://www.fantasynamegen.com/

35. https://www.orrt.org/literary/names.php

36. https://thestoryshack.com/tools/pen-name-generator/

37. https://coda.io/@hales/fake-name-generator

38. https://www.selfpublishingtitans.com/tools/Pen-Name-Generator

39. https://www.brandroot.com/business-name-generator

40. https://randomnamegenerators.com/various-name-generators/pen-name-generator/

41. https://www.renderforest.com/business-name-generator

The Bottom Line: A Pen Name is an author’s useful tool for the right reasons.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else?

Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!


Snappy Sound Bites Will Turn a TV Appearance Into A Huge Success Says Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Snappy Sound Bites Will Turn a TV Appearance Into A Huge Success Says Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Book Marketing

Authors seeking to become a TV talk show guest must learn to master the fine art of using sound bites. Local and national television thrives on sound bites, those brief, quotable remarks that will be repeated again and again on television news and talk shows. Sound bites are the pearls that flow out of our mouths into the ears of TV producers and onto the airways.

If you want to be quoted, you must convert the message points in your book into sound bites. To do this remember that analogies, bold action words, emotions and personal examples, attacks and absolutes make good quotes and sound bites. The highly personal, classic sound bite has action, emotion, and attacks; all of these elements will work to make reporters swoon.

My experience as a book publicist and book marketing expert has taught me to compare an author’s book with something else that is better known. For example, one of my clients’ books is a time travel, sci-fi. Here’s the sound bite: “BAD LOVE STRIKES is like Raiders of the Lost Ark meets Goonies.” See how that paints a picture? Another client’s book is about sci-fi alien romance. So we came up with, “If you like the movies ‘Shape of Water’ and ‘Avatar’ you’ll love KAIRN, Mates of the Alliance.”

The sound bite serves the purpose of telling a long story in a few words.

You can tell people who the book is for. “This book is for recent college graduates looking for a job in TECH.”  Or, “This is the perfect book for people who want to know all they can about ChatGPT and AI.”

What about YOU? Are you skilled enough in producing sound bites to earn an interview on local or national TV? If you’ve not had media training, believe me it’s too late once you get the call. You may have to get in a car or on a plane within an hour’s notice. That’s why you need to be prepared before you get the call. When my clients agree to media coaching, my first choice for them is Jess Todtfeld.

Jess is one of the leading authorities on media training in the world. With more than 25 years of media training experience, Todtfeld has trained thousands of CEOs, authors, and experts, including leading government officials in the United States and members of the United Nations.

Another well-known media trainer, TJ Walker came up with several good sound bite creation techniques he’s shared:

  1. Create sound bites that are 10, 15 and 30 seconds.
  2. Work an example into the sound bite.
  3. Use Clichés. Reporters can’t write clichés, but they love quoting other people using them.
  4. Humor can be memorable but only if you are not talking about a serious topic.
  5. One great way to get your message quoted by reporters is to state your ideas in the form of a rhetorical question.
  6. Opposition quotes make good quotes and sound bites. Opposition quotes remain a favorite of reporters but use them only if and when they are appropriate to your message.
  7. Absolutes are absolutely quote worthy. If I say “We will be the next champions!” That has a better chance of landing in the story than “We are hoping to win.” Saying “Our company is the top performer in this field” would be another example.
  8. Recycle your quotes. If one worked well with another media interview in the past, use it again.
  9. Use pop culture references in your quotes.
  10. Put analogies in your answers, use bold, action-oriented words, let your emotions flow freely, and attack your way to the headlines.

A sound bite is only one aspect of a successful television appearance. You must also be concerned about your total message, the knowledge you display, and the self-confidence you demonstrate.

As a book publicist I’ll prepare questions for our clients ahead of time and include those in our press kits sent to the host. Often the interviewer will read those questions right in order. Other times they refer to our questions and include some of them. That’ll help you because you’ll know what to expect and you can respond with the sound bites you’ve already developed.

The Bottom Line: Prepare some snappy sound bites ahead of time, rehearse them every day and you’ll sound like a pro turning your TV appearance into a huge success.

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Book Marketing at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else? Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!


18 Literary Agents Reveal “How to Land a Book Deal”

Literary Agents Spill The Beans

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Whether you’re a new author or have been on the New York Times Bestseller List for years, literary agents are likely top of mind. After all, these professionals may be just what you need to get published or take your career to the next level. A quality agent can review your manuscript and help you land a lucrative book deal.

Since literary agents are so integral to success, I came up with this revealing compilation of interviews with literary agents. Tune in and prepare to be inspired! Sometimes all that it takes is a little insight into the process that can help you gain a competitive edge and succeed in your writing career.

1. Jeff Herman

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0F4vvTWG74)

Jeff Herman is a well-respected agent and the author of “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents.” He entered book publishing in his mid 20s when he didn’t have much experience. Since he had to figure out a lot on his own, he wrote this book to steer new authors in the right direction. In my opinion, investing in this book is a must, no matter where you are in your career. Once you read it, you’ll find it well worth the money.

Jeff Herman

2. Brooks Sherman

(https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2116395441773699)

Brooks Sherman shares what he looks for in a query letter. He explains that the most effective letters focus on plot and character rather than themes or messages. In addition, he likes to learn about a writer’s educational background as well as details about any past publications and writer’s workshops they’ve participated in.

Brooks Sherman

3. Mollie Glick

(https://sobookingcool.com/2018/09/12/interview-with-literary-agent-mollie-glick/)

Mollie Glick states that she loves her job as a literacy agent because it challenges her to figure out how to push messages that are worth sharing into the world. She often reaches out to authors who have accomplished something that is incredibly inspirational or post something that sparks an interesting conversation.

Mollie Glick

4. Sallyanne Sweeney

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEoU5xA6HeY)

Sallyanne Sweeney explains that she enjoys working with writers on manuscripts that they might have been working on for years. She loves to see the transformation from an initial idea to a finished book and being involved in every aspect of the publishing process.

Sallyanne Sweeney

5. Howard Yoon

(https://www.rossyoon.com/howard-yoon)

Howard Yoon explains that the process of working with an author is a lot like dating. During the first couple of meetings, you’re not sure if things are going to work out. When it actually does work, everything clicks. Yoon chooses books he believes have a valuable contribution to the world.

Howard Yoon

6. Mark Gottlieb

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sQGSPrdaA8)

Mark Gottlieb talks about how authors can go about finding agents. He says that authors should always aim high and think highly of themselves. Gottlieb recommends Publishers Marketplace, which ranks publishers by number of books deals and lets you filter your search by genre.

Mark Gottlieb

7. Alyssa Jennette

(https://www.facebook.com/cardinalrulepress/videos/1158824181170762)

Alyssa Jennette talks about what authors should do before seeking an agent. She suggests they send their work to a critique group, an editor, or another professional so they can look it over and provide feedback before it gets in front of an agent. This way it’ll be as ready for publishing as possible.

Alyssa Jennette

8. Jessica Reino

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM-Y8xucJsE)

Jessica Reino reinforces the fact that every author is unique so it’s important to write what you want to write and edit your work the way you see fit. She also discusses Twitter and other social media platforms, which she highly recommends to nonfiction authors. Reino notes that if you’re going to create social media outlets, only do so if you’re going to actively use them.

Jessica Reino

9. Eva Scalzo

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL0vYbcgohY)

Eva Scalzo encourages her authors to tell her which editors and publishers they’d like to work with as many have specific preferences. She advises them on what they need to know about these professionals and organizations and helps them come up with a backup plan.

Eva Scalzo

10. Katie Greenstreet

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rr6d0X2P7k)

Katie Greenstreet explains that she looks for a very unique voice in the first chapter. She loves quirky narrators and will always be drawn to something that she hasn’t seen before. Greenstreet also wants to know that an author truly understands the big picture of their work and conveys it clearly in their synopsis.

Katie Greenstreet

11. Jim McCarthy

(http://www.middlegradeninja.com/2020/08/middle-grade-ninja-episode-88-literary.html)

Jim McCarthy explains that there are plenty of great books, but he can’t represent them for the sole reason that he doesn’t have the editorial vision for them. He reinforces the fact that authors should find agents that are worthy of them.

Jim McCarthy

12. Stephen Barbara

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2ymzI9EcLk)

Stephen Barbara reveals that his role as an agent is a combination of support, advocacy, and a little bit of therapy. He also explains that he likes query letters that prove writers have done their research and know who he is and what he’s done in the past.

Stephen Barbara

13. Broo Doherty

(https://vimeo.com/511534956)

Broo Doherty discusses general questions about literary agents and gives insight about what it’s like to be an agent. She also dives deep into what she’s looking for in new clients and how she manages her existing client base.

Broo Doherty

14. Ted Weinstein

(https://vimeo.com/18828443)

Ted Weinstein states that the keys to success for any author come down to two things: marketability and personal passion. He also encourages authors to do their research when looking for agents and recommends a few great books for them to read.

Ted Weinstein

15. Davinia Andrew-Lynch

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kRN33R_Y68)

Davinia Andrew-Lynch goes over the typical day of a literary agent. She explains that every day is different. Some days are packed with meetings while others are filled with editing manuscripts. There are also days reserved for admin work like sorting through contracts and consulting with designers about covers.

Davinia Andrew-Lynch

16. Donald Maass

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BhFf27agew)

Renowned agent Donald Maass founded the Donald Maass Literary Agency in 1980. His agency sells more than 150 novels to major publishers on a national and global level. He states that he tries to articulate why a certain plot or character isn’t working to truly help authors.

Donald Maass

17. Andrea Somberg

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axgOKH-2p8o)

Andrea Somberg has been a literary agent for over 15 years and represents several New York Times bestselling authors. In this hour-long interview, she discusses a number of topics, including what draws her to queries, what types of authors succeed, and how new authors can grow their careers.

Andrea Somberg

18. Chip MacGregor

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PeuQOd5bIg)

Chip MacGregor has represented many big-time authors including Brennan Manning, Vincent Zandri, Rachel Hauck, Mindy Clark, Irene Hannon, Bonnie Gray, and Michelle McKinney. In this interview, he talks about the changing world of publishing, primarily in the Christian market.

Chip MacGregor

The Bottom Line: Watch these literary agent interviews. Take notes. Even if they don’t represent your genre, they can offer your insight into the process of “Getting A BOOK DEAL.”

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else?

Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!


How to Title Your Book

How to Title Your Book By Scott Lorenz

By Scott Lorenz
Westwind Communications

Some authors agonize over the titling of their book and some pull it straight out of thin air. I suggest a more methodical approach.

Book Title GeneratorI was recently interviewed by author and television talk show host Tara Kachaturoff on Michigan Entrepreneur TV. We discussed book marketing, book publicity and the care authors should take in the creation of their own book title.

As the author of Book Title Generator: A Proven System in Naming Your Book and as a book publicist I can attest to the importance of naming your book properly.

A bad title gets panned by the public and a forgettable title is, well, forgotten!

The most important aspect in the book publishing process, besides writing a good book, is to have a memorable title. So, I created a step-by-step method in selecting a title and put that in my book.

“This is an amazing book,” said Kachaturoff. “It is excellent. Since I work in this area with my clients, and have written a couple of books, I know how important a good title is. The book is phenomenal and covers so much,” she concluded.

I use a multi-prong book titling strategy with high-tech tools, researching bestsellers by genre and choosing ‘title keywords’ which get a book ranked on search engines and Amazon. I also recommend that authors consider the use of numbers, alliteration, and idioms in the quest for the perfect book title.

Watch the entire interview at https://bit.ly/ScottLorenz_Book_Publicist_EntrepreneurTV

 

Book Title Generator has received dozens of awards in numerous categories ranging from writing and publishing to business and marketing. The awards include: The Independent Author Network Award, Pinnacle Book Achievement Award, eLit Award, Literary Titan Book Award, Royal Dragonfly Award, American Book Fest, Book Readers Appreciation, Wishing Shelf, The New England Book Festival, Firebird Book Awards, New York Book Festival, San Francisco Book Festival, The Presidents Book Award, IPPY Book Award, Next Generation Award, AXIOM Business Book Award, Book Excellence Award, AMG International, PenCraft Book Achievement, Book of the Year Award, Best Book Award, B.R.A.G. Medallion, FAPA’s President’s Silver Award and the International Book Award.

If you take the time and utilize the tools laid out in the book and choose the right search engine-optimized title, your book will have a competitive advantage and have a shot at being at the top of the Amazon rankings. Choose the wrong title and your book languishes in obscurity.

Here’s what authors and top Amazon reviewers say about Book Title Generator:

“Bottom line: this is a compilation of clever ideas from a highly-experienced book publicist. Even the most experienced author will benefit from them.” —Richard B. Schwartz, Amazon Top 500 Reviewer, Top Contributor, 5-Stars

“I particularly enjoyed his analysis on the effectiveness of idioms, alliteration, and metaphors in developing effective book titles. I recommend the book to both new and experienced authors.” —Barbara Mojica, Amazon Top 1000 Reviewer, Top Contributor, 5-Stars

“This is an indispensable, first rate adjunct to the art of writing – and selling- your book. The goal: discoverability! Very highly recommended.” —Grady Harp, Amazon Top 50 Hall of Fame Reviewer, 5-Stars

“Book Publicist Scott Lorenz gives you the ABCs and XYZs of picking the perfect title for that book you have put your heart into. It’s required reading for aspiring or experienced writers.” —John Kelly, Detroit Free Press, 5 Stars

“I am an author, and I have been writing for over 10 years. This book is exactly what I have been looking for all this time. Scott Lorenz understands the creative side while delving into the marketing side of naming a book. It explains how to set yourself up for success.” —Iris, Amazon reviewer, 5 Stars

The book is available on Amazon in ebook for Kindle, paperback and as an audiobook. Find out more at: www.BookTitleGenerator.net

Watch the book trailer here: https://bit.ly/BookTitleGeneratorTrailer

Listen to a sample of the audiobook here: http://bit.ly/AudioSampleBookTitleGen

The Bottom Line: Take your time and use my proven system in naming your book!

About Book Publicist Scott Lorenz

Book publicist Scott Lorenz is President of Westwind Communications, a public relations and marketing firm that has a special knack for working with authors to help them get all the publicity they deserve and more. Lorenz works with bestselling authors and self-published authors promoting all types of books, whether it’s their first book or their 15th book. He’s handled publicity for books by CEOs, CIA Officers, Navy SEALS, Homemakers, Fitness Gurus, Doctors, Lawyers and Adventurers. His clients have been featured by Good Morning America, FOX & Friends, CNN, ABC News, New York Times, Nightline, TIME, PBS, LA Times, USA Today, Washington Post, Woman’s World, & Howard Stern to name a few.

Learn more about Westwind Communications’ book marketing approach at https://www.WestwindBookMarketing.com or contact Lorenz at [email protected] or 734-667-2090 or fill out the form below. Follow Lorenz on Twitter @aBookPublicist. Want help titling a book? Check out Scott Lorenz’s new award winning, bestselling book: Book Title Generator- A Proven System in Naming Your Book www.BookTitleGenerator.net.

Would you like help promoting your book?

If so, tell us a little about your book. What is the title? Do you have a publisher? What is the publish date? How many pages is your book? What is the cost? Do you have web site? What is your specific goal I.E., to make money, raise awareness, get the attention of an agent or publisher, sell the story to a movie or TV studio or something else?

Submit the form below with this information and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!